Ambloplites rupestris

  • Scientific name
  • Ambloplites rupestris (Rafinesque, 1817)

  • Common name
  • Rock bass

  • Family
  • Centrarchidae

  • External links
  • Fishbase
Trait completeness 58%
Total data97
References12
Image of Ambloplites rupestris

Author: Fabrice Téletchéa
License: All rights reserved

Traits detail



Egg (86%)


Trait id Trait Primary data Secondary Data References
4 Egg adhesiveness Adhesive Adhesive Scott and Crossman, 1973
4 Egg adhesiveness The eggs adhere to the nest substrate Adhesive Gross and Nowell, 1980
4 Egg adhesiveness Adhesive eggs incubate on rootlets or venegation in nest Adhesive Goodyear, 1982
4 Egg adhesiveness The freshly laid, adhesive eggs Adhesive Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987
5 Incubation time 3-4 3.5 days Carrel, 2001
5 Incubation time 3-4 days at 20.5-21°C 3.5 days Scott and Crossman, 1973
5 Incubation time 5 days in natural conditions 5.0 days Gross and Nowell, 1980
5 Incubation time 3-4 3.5 days Kerr and Grant, 1999
5 Incubation time 3-4 days at 69-70°F or 10-12 days at 60°F 3.5 days Goodyear, 1982
5 Incubation time 3.5 [Mean time to egg hatch within the range of average post-spawning the range post-spawning water temperatures] 3.5 days Olden, 2006
5 Incubation time In our study 4.33, in other 4 [At 20.4°C], 48 to 53 hours [At 22-23°C], 3 days 22.5 days Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987
7 Degree-days for incubation 60-80 [3-4 days at 20.5-21°C] 70.0 °C * day Scott and Crossman, 1973
7 Degree-days for incubation In our study 4.33, in other 4 [At 20.4°C], 48 to 53 hours [At 22-23°C], 3 days 22.5 °C * day Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987
7 Degree-days for incubation 3-4 days at 69-70°F or 10-12 days at 60°F 3.5 °C * day Goodyear, 1982
6 Temperature for incubation 20.5-21 20.75 °C Scott and Crossman, 1973
6 Temperature for incubation 16-22 [Natural conditions] 19.0 °C Gross and Nowell, 1980
3 Egg Buoyancy Demersal [sink in to the nest] Ambiguous Gross and Nowell, 1980
3 Egg Buoyancy Incubate on rootlets or venegation in nest No category Goodyear, 1982
1 Oocyte diameter 2.0-2.1 [Not specified] 2.05 mm Carrel, 2001
1 Oocyte diameter 1.7-1.9 [Not specified, seems to be unswollen] 1.8 mm Mittelbach and Persson, 1998
1 Oocyte diameter 2.1 [Mean diameter of mature, fully yolked, ovarian oocyte] 2.1 mm Olden, 2006

Larvae (29%)


Trait id Trait Primary Data Secondary Data References
8 Initial larval size 5.3 5.3 mm Olden, 2006
9 Larvae behaviour Nine days before leaving the nest Demersal Gross and Nowell, 1980
9 Larvae behaviour Prolarvae remain in nest 2-3 days Demersal Goodyear, 1982
9 Larvae behaviour Wrigglers, initially translucent and immobilie with large golden yolk sacs, gradually darkened as they grew and absorbed yolk allowing their developing eyes to become conspicuous. Wrriggler movement gradually increased, the young formaing a churning cloud of free-swimming fry above the substrate just before their synchronous liberation from each nest Demersal Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987

Female (33%)


Trait id Trait Primary Data Secondary Data References
19 Relative fecundity 7-30 18.5 thousand eggs/kg Mittelbach and Persson, 1998
27 Age at sexual maturity 2-3 [Sex not specified] 2.5 years Carrel, 2001
27 Age at sexual maturity 3.0 [Sex not specified] 3.0 years Olden, 2006
20 Absolute fecundity 3-11 7.0 thousand eggs Carrel, 2001
20 Absolute fecundity 3-11 7.0 thousand eggs Scott and Crossman, 1973
20 Absolute fecundity 3.8 [Total number of eggs or offsprings per breeding season] 3.8 thousand eggs Olden, 2006
16 Length at sexual maturity 12.0 [Both sex] 12.0 cm Olden, 2006
15 Age at sexual maturity 2-3 [Sex not specified] 2.5 year Carrel, 2001
15 Age at sexual maturity 3.0 [Sex not specified] 3.0 year Olden, 2006

Male (33%)


Trait id Trait Primary Data Secondary Data References
30 Male sexual dimorphism During spawning the male's body darkens, resulting in a pitch-black male contrasting sharply beside the unchanged female Absent Gross and Nowell, 1980
28 Length at sexual maturity 12.0 [Both sex] 12.0 cm Olden, 2006

Spawning conditions (93%)


Trait id Trait Primary Data Secondary Data References
47 Mating system More than one female may spawn in the same nest and one female may spawn in more than one nest No category Scott and Crossman, 1973
47 Mating system By pair, apparent promiscuity [A female may spawn in different nests (3 males maximum). Males may also spawn with more than one female and four males were observed serially spawning with alternating female] Ambiguous Gross and Nowell, 1980
47 Mating system Individulas may spawn in different nests with different mates No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
46 Nycthemeral period of oviposition Spawning occured more often in early morning (0700-1100: n=10) than either mid-day (1100-1330: n=3) or late evening (2010-2045: n=2) suggesting a temporal preference Day Gross and Nowell, 1980
46 Nycthemeral period of oviposition Spawning observed in 1981 began inearly afternoon at 1300 D.S.T. (n=43) and typically lasted about 1.5 h. Middle Thames rock bass spawned primarily in early afternoon, consistent with nest starts occuring in early morning and their completion soon after, followed by males beginning to accept the advances of females. This difference with other authors perhaps results from the more leisurely pace at which Lake Opinicon fish constructed their nests, a 2-day interval on average sperating nest start and spaning Day Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987
50 Parental care The spawning is guarded by male Male parental care Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
50 Parental care The spawning is guarded by male Male parental care Billard, 1997
50 Parental care The male guards and fans the eggs and later brrods the young for a short period Male parental care Scott and Crossman, 1973
50 Parental care The male cares about the young No category Fishbase, 2006
50 Parental care Male provides care for the eggs and larvae interm of egg fanning and predator defence: on average 14 days No category Gross and Nowell, 1980
50 Parental care Males guard eggs and fry Male parental care Kerr and Grant, 1999
50 Parental care Male guards nest and newly hatched fry Male parental care Goodyear, 1982
50 Parental care Brrods are guarded No category Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987
44 Spawning substrate Gravels or plants Ambiguous Billard, 1997
44 Spawning substrate Gravels Lithophils Carrel, 2001
44 Spawning substrate Swamps and gravels shoals Lithophils Scott and Crossman, 1973
44 Spawning substrate Coarse sand to gravel, nest susbtrate averaging 1.7 cm [No nests were found in muddy, organic substrates] Ambiguous Gross and Nowell, 1980
44 Spawning substrate Sand or gravel bottom, swamps, gravels shoals, coarse sand or gravel bottom Ambiguous Kerr and Grant, 1999
44 Spawning substrate Lithophil Lithophils Balon, 1975
44 Spawning substrate Gravel, rock, sand, clay, marl or vegetation to expose fibrous plant roolets Ambiguous Goodyear, 1982
45 Spawning site preparation Excavations buried on the ground No category Billard, 1997
45 Spawning site preparation A nest is built No category Carrel, 2001
45 Spawning site preparation The male digs a shallow nest Susbtrate chooser Scott and Crossman, 1973
45 Spawning site preparation Nesters Nest built by both parents Fishbase, 2006
45 Spawning site preparation Male constructs a nest [Male extablish territories which each male constructs its nest. Nesting territories are aggressively defended from other fish] Nest built by male Gross and Nowell, 1980
45 Spawning site preparation Male clear shawllow depression up to 0.6 m in diameter No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
45 Spawning site preparation Nest spawner No category Balon, 1975
45 Spawning site preparation Eggs are deposited in shallow depression excavated Susbtrate chooser Goodyear, 1982
45 Spawning site preparation Males in our study excavated nests larger than do lakes fish No category Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987
41 Spawning temperature 15-27 21.0 °C Carrel, 2001
41 Spawning temperature 15.6-21.1 18.35 °C Scott and Crossman, 1973
41 Spawning temperature Breeding starts when water temperature reach 20-23 21.5 °C Gross and Nowell, 1980
41 Spawning temperature 16-21 18.5 °C Mittelbach and Persson, 1998
41 Spawning temperature 16-21, 15.6, 15.6-21.1 and 20.6-23.3 18.5 °C Kerr and Grant, 1999
41 Spawning temperature At 57-75°F, i.e., 14-24°C 66.0 °C Goodyear, 1982
41 Spawning temperature 16 [Temperature at which spawning is typically initiated] 16.0 °C Olden, 2006
41 Spawning temperature Nesting began at water temperature lower than in lakes, where they span 20 to 23°C 20.0 °C Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987
40 Spawning period duration 4-5 [The nesting period lasted 42 days (20 May-30 June) but most reproductive activity occured within a 19 day period (21 May-8 June)] 4.5 weeks Gross and Nowell, 1980
40 Spawning period duration In 1981, adult males were first seen on the breeding grounds in early May, designated at the start of the breeding season. Number of males peaked in early June, then declined to zero in late July, the end of the breeding season. The last observation of a female occured almost 3 weeks earlier, however. The study site breeding season started earlier and finished lated then inlakes studied at similar latitudes 1981.0 weeks Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987
42 Spawning water type Lake, near the shorline Stagnant water Gross and Nowell, 1980
42 Spawning water type Sheltered nearshore areas, including bays, harbors, lagoons, marshes, creek mouths, and lower reaches of tributaries, current-swept lake shoals and ledges, moderateswift water in streams, Ambiguous Goodyear, 1982
43 Spawning depth Shallow waters: mean water depth of nests was 77.4 cm. While nests ranged from 45 to 138 cm depth, the majority of males (64%) nested between 50 and 69 cm 77.4 m Gross and Nowell, 1980
43 Spawning depth 50-75 cm in depth 62.5 m Kerr and Grant, 1999
43 Spawning depth To 20 feet, usually less than 6 feet 20.0 m Goodyear, 1982
43 Spawning depth Mean water depth over nest is 60.33 ± 0.92 cm 60.33 m Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987
36 Spawning migration distance Often move many males along shore to rech bays and creek mouths, stream residents congregate in pools just before spawning No data Goodyear, 1982
36 Spawning migration distance Move inshore within the same lake No data Gross and Nowell, 1980
37 Spawning migration period Move inshore beginning at 55°F No data Goodyear, 1982
39 Spawning season May-June ['May', 'June'] Billard, 1997
39 Spawning season May-June ['May', 'June'] Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
39 Spawning season April to Mid-July ['April', 'July'] Carrel, 2001
39 Spawning season Late spring and ealry summer, probably June in Canada ['April', 'May', 'September', 'August', 'June', 'July'] Scott and Crossman, 1973
39 Spawning season April to July ['April', 'July'] Fishbase, 2006
39 Spawning season May-June ['May', 'June'] Gross and Nowell, 1980
39 Spawning season Late spring and early summer ['April', 'May', 'September', 'August', 'June', 'July'] Kerr and Grant, 1999
39 Spawning season April-early August, usually late May-June ['April', 'August', 'May', 'June'] Goodyear, 1982
39 Spawning season Nesting was asynchronous both years, occurring from mid-May to mid-July ['May', 'July'] Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987
48 Spawning release Multiple spawner Mutliple Carrel, 2001
48 Spawning release Multiple spawner Mutliple Gross and Nowell, 1980
48 Spawning release Spawing takes place at short intervals over a period of 1 hour or more but only a few eggs are laid at time No category Scott and Crossman, 1973
49 Parity Lake residents than return to lake Iteroparous Goodyear, 1982