Spawning conditions - Spawning site preparation



Species Primary Data Secondary Data References
Anguilla anguilla Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Anguilla anguilla Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Alosa alosa No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Alosa alosa Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Alosa alosa Eggs are spread in the water column No category Bardonnet and Jatteau, 2008
Alosa fallax No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Alosa fallax No, eggs are released directly into the water column Open water/substratum scatter Doherty, 2004
Alosa fallax Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Alosa sapidissima No, eggs are released in the open water Open water/substratum scatter Scott and Crossman, 1973
Alosa sapidissima Broadcast their eggs in the water Open water/substratum scatter Mills, 2004
Alosa sapidissima Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Alosa sapidissima Eggs are released into open water Open water/substratum scatter Bradbury, 1999
Alosa sapidissima Eggs are broadcast Open water/substratum scatter Burdick and Hightower, 2005
Aphanius iberus Eggs are deposited on plants located on the ground Susbtrate chooser Billard, 1997
Aphanius iberus Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Aphanius iberus Open water / substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Aphanius iberus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Valencia hispanica Eggs are released directly within plants Open water/substratum scatter Keith, 2001
Valencia hispanica Open water / substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Valencia hispanica Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Barbatula barbatula No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Barbatula barbatula Open water / substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Barbatula barbatula The eggs are not laid in holes but on stones and plants No category Smyly, 1955
Cobitis taenia No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Cobitis taenia Open water/substratum egg scatteres Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Cobitis taenia No, eggs are deposited on the bottom Susbtrate chooser Lodi and Malacarne, 1990
Cobitis paludica Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Blicca bjoerkna No, open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Blicca bjoerkna Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Abramis brama No nest, but some males are territorial and very aggressive and others are non-territorial Open water/substratum scatter Poncin, 1996
Abramis brama Males are territorial No category Olivier, 2001
Abramis brama No, eggs are deposited on plants nut male defends its teritory and when another male appears there is intensive slashing Susbtrate chooser Backiel and Zawiska, 1968
Abramis brama Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Abramis brama Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Abramis brama Territorial males No category Ah-King, 2004
Alburnoides bipunctatus No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Alburnoides bipunctatus No nest, eggs are only released on ground Open water/substratum scatter Persat, 2001
Alburnoides bipunctatus Open sustratum spawners No category Mann, 1996
Alburnoides bipunctatus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Alburnus alburnus Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Alburnus alburnus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Aristichthys nobilis No, open water/substratum eggs scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Aspius aspius Open susbstratum spawners No category Mann, 1996
Aspius aspius Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Barbus barbus Kind of, females dig a depression in the ground Susbtrate chooser Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Barbus barbus Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Barbus barbus Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Barbus barbus Open water/ substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Barbus barbus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Barbus barbus Lay their eggs in 5-8 cm pits [Male barbel do not defend territories] Susbtrate chooser Baras and Philippart, 1999
Carassius auratus No, deposit its eggs No category Scott and Crossman, 1973
Carassius auratus Scatter their adhesive eggs No category Scholfield, 2005
Carassius auratus Non-territorial No category Kobayashi, 2002
Carassius carassius No, eggs are laid on plant susbtrates Susbtrate chooser Laurila, 1987
Carassius carassius Open water/susbtratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Carassius carassius Release over vegetation No category Scholfield, 2005
Carassius carassius The species is described as being phytophil, open substrate spawner No category Laurila and Holopainen, 1990
Chondrostoma nasus No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Chondrostoma nasus No, deposits its eggs on the substratum surface No category Heckeis, 1996
Chondrostoma nasus No, open water/susbtratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Chondrostoma nasus No, scatter their eggs over susbtrate Susbtrate chooser Kamler, 1998
Chondrostoma nasus Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Chondrostoma nasus Spawns by scattering eggs: the eggs are release into the water column No category Kamler and Keckeis, 2000
Chondrostoma nasus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Chondrostoma nasus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Kamler, 1996
Chondrostoma nasus Deposit its eggs on the substratum surface No category Keckeis, 1996
Chondrostoma nasus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Keckeis, 2001
Chondrostoma toxostoma No, eggs are deposited on boulders in deep pools Susbtrate chooser Gozlan, 1999
Chondrostoma toxostoma Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Chondrostoma toxostoma Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Chondrostoma toxostoma Eggs are deposited on the substrate Susbtrate chooser Bensettiti and Gaudillat, 2002
Ctenopharyngodon idella No, open waters/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Ctenopharyngodon idella Not any male spawning territory No category Ah-King, 2004
Cyprinus carpio No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Cyprinus carpio Eggs are deposited randomly Susbtrate chooser Scott and Crossman, 1973
Cyprinus carpio Open water/substratum eggs scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Cyprinus carpio Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Cyprinus carpio Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Cyprinus carpio Not any male spawning territory No category Ah-King, 2004
Cyprinus carpio Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Kamler, 1996
Cyprinus carpio Open-substratum No category Smith, 2004
Gobio gobio No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Gobio gobio Open water/susbtratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Gobio gobio No, eggs are laid on substrate [Open substratum spawners] Ambiguous Mann, 1996
Gobio gobio Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Gobio gobio Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Gobio gobio Ce comportement a pour effet de libérer les œufs dans la colonne d'eau No category Poncin, 1997
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix No No category Verigin, 1999
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Open water/susbtratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Belong to the pelagophilous group No category Belova, 1981
Leucaspius delineatus Rudimentary nest No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Leucaspius delineatus Females may also lay their eggs in a disc-shaped patch on any flat surface Susbtrate chooser Coad, 2005
Leucaspius delineatus Kind of a nest No category Cassou and Le Louarn, 1991
Leucaspius delineatus Male guards a single nest site, once a nest site is obtained, the male either encircled or remained a fixed position at the nest site, at times cleaning the nest surface with his mouth No category Gozlan, 2003
Leucaspius delineatus Substratum choosers No category Balon, 1975
Leucaspius delineatus Spawn on any smooth objects such as branches, floating leaves, plastic debris, even bottom of boats. No category Gozlan, 2003b
Leucaspius delineatus Females deposits their eggs in a ribbon No category Bonislawska, 1999
Leuciscus cephalus Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Leuciscus cephalus Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Leuciscus idus Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Leuciscus idus Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Leuciscus leuciscus No, eggs are deposited on the substrates Susbtrate chooser Persat, 2001
Leuciscus leuciscus Open water/susbtratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Leuciscus leuciscus Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Leuciscus leuciscus Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Leuciscus leuciscus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Mylopharyngodon piceus Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Phoxinus phoxinus No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Phoxinus phoxinus No, female lays their eggs on substrates No category Kestemont, 2001
Phoxinus phoxinus Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Phoxinus phoxinus Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Phoxinus phoxinus Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Phoxinus phoxinus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Phoxinus phoxinus Not any male spawning territory No category Ah-King, 2004
Phoxinus phoxinus Lay their eggs Susbtrate chooser Frost, 1943
Pimephales promelas Nesters Nest built by both parents Fishbase, 2006
Pimephales promelas Males establish and defend territory and care for eggs laid there No category DeWitt, 1993
Pimephales promelas Males construct nest Nest built by male Kerr and Grant, 1999
Pimephales promelas Eggs are laid in a nest hollowed out in mud or sand under submerged objects, such as rocks, sticks or cans. They are deposited in a mass on the underside of the objects Susbtrate chooser Goodyear, 1982
Pimephales promelas It seems evident that the male chooses the location of a nest for he is often seen wandering about for hours, aournd a suitable place, where eggs were found later. No category Markus, 1934
Pseudorasbora parva Male clean the surface of one or several gravel of 13-31 cm of diameter Nest built by male Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Pseudorasbora parva The fish choose a suitable place for spawning and clean it of ooze and overgrouwth No category Makeyeva and Mokamed, 1982
Pseudorasbora parva Nests under stones and the male cleans the cavity with its pearl organs Nest built by male Fishbase, 2006
Pseudorasbora parva Before spawning, the female carefully cleans the susbtratum for egg-laying No category Witkowski, 2006
Pseudorasbora parva In Pseudorasbora, a mature males establish a territory around spawning susbtrates (e.g., stones, plants or shells) onto which females will deposit their eggs. Almost all dominant males attacked other males with aggressive behavior such as chasing, head butting, or circling between males Susbtrate chooser Konishi and Takata, 2004
Pseudorasbora parva Males set up mating territories around smooth surfaces of rocks, boulders and plants No category Katano and Maekawa, 1997
Rhodeus sericeus Males defend territories around one or several mussel No category Smith, 2004
Rhodeus sericeus Male defend a territory around one or several mussels, then a he brings a female No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Rhodeus sericeus Male defend territories around mussels to which they lead females to spawn No category Smith, 2001
Rhodeus sericeus Males defend territories around freswater mussels No category Aldridge, 1999
Rhodeus sericeus Males defend territories around freswater mussels No category Oliver and Carrel, 2001
Rhodeus sericeus Maes defend a territory around a mussel, for amarus No category Bensettiti and Gaudillat, 2002
Rutilus rutilus No No category Diamond, 1985
Rutilus rutilus Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Rutilus rutilus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Rutilus rutilus Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Rutilus rutilus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Rutilus rutilus Dos not display parental care No category Kort, 2004
Scardinius erythrophthalmus Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Scardinius erythrophthalmus Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Scardinius erythrophthalmus Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Scardinius erythrophthalmus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Scardinius erythrophthalmus Deposit their eggs No category Hicks, 2003
Tinca tinca No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Tinca tinca Female lay their eggs Susbtrate chooser Feunteun, 2001
Tinca tinca Open water / substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Tinca tinca Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Tinca tinca Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Tinca tinca Not any male spawning territory No category Ah-King, 2004
Tinca tinca Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Kamler, 1996
Vimba vimba Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Vimba vimba Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Vimba vimba Female lays their eggs on substrate No category Keith and Allardi, 2001
Vimba vimba Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Gambusia affinis No special placement of zygotes No category Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Esox masquinongy No nest is built Open water/substratum scatter Scott and Crossman, 1973
Esox masquinongy Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Esox masquinongy Fertilized eggs are scattered at random No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Esox masquinongy Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Esox masquinongy Eggs are scattered No category Goodyear, 1982
Esox masquinongy The fertilized eggs are scattered into the vegetation No category Wynne, 2006
Esox masquinongy Eggs are scattered No category Clemmons and Newman, 1997
Esox niger No nests are built [Eggs are shed over the substrate] Open water/substratum scatter Coffie, 1998
Esox niger No nests are built Open water/substratum scatter Scott and Crossman, 1973
Esox niger Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Esox niger Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Esox niger Scattered over underwater weeds No category Pennslylvania fishes, 2006
Esox niger None No category Anonymous, 2006
Esox niger Adhesive eggs are scattered over the vegetation No category Wynne, 2006
Esox niger Eggs are distributed over relatively large area No category Ah-King, 2004
Esox lucius No cleaning of the subrates prior to spawning and no nest Open water/substratum scatter Souchon, 1983
Esox lucius No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Esox lucius Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Esox lucius No nest is built, the eggs are scattered at radom Open water/substratum scatter Scott and Crossman, 1973
Esox lucius Deposited eggs Susbtrate chooser Lucas, 1992
Esox lucius Open substratum spawners Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Esox lucius Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Esox lucius Random spawner No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Esox lucius Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Esox lucius The eggs are scattered over flooded terrestrial or aquatic vegetation No category Wynne, 2006
Esox lucius Pike are broadcast spawners Open water/substratum scatter Bradbury, 1999
Esox lucius Eggs are scattered No category Goodyear, 1982
Lota lota No nest is built Open water/substratum scatter Scott and Crossman, 1973
Lota lota Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Lota lota No, eggs are laid on stones/gravels Susbtrate chooser Mann, 1996
Lota lota Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Lota lota Eggs are broadcast into the water column well above the substrate Open water/substratum scatter Bradbury, 1999
Lota lota No nest is built Open water/substratum scatter Ah-King, 2004
Lota lota No nests are built Open water/substratum scatter Anonymous, 2003
Gasterosteus aculeatus Male builts a nest in form of a barrel using parts of plants and renal secretions Nest built by male Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Gasterosteus aculeatus Males builds a barrel-shaped nest with plant fragments and renal secretions No category Internet, 2005
Gasterosteus aculeatus The male builds a barrel-shaped nest in shallow, sandy areas from plant fragments glued together on the bottom with kidney secretions Nest built by male Coad, 2005
Gasterosteus aculeatus Male builts a nest with rests of plants (Arianophile) Nest built by male Billard, 1997
Gasterosteus aculeatus Male defends a teritory and builts a nest with piece of plants sticking by secretion from kidney No category Crivelli, 2001
Gasterosteus aculeatus Just before breeding, males become very territorial. The male builds a nest of plant-material glued together with spigging, a protein produced in the kidney. Nest built by male Fishbase, 2006
Gasterosteus aculeatus The nest is constructed of small twigs and plant debris, held together by the mucilaginous kidney secretion emitted by the male No category Scott and Crossman, 1973
Gasterosteus aculeatus Form nest No category Environment agency, 1996
Gasterosteus aculeatus Nest spawner No category Balon, 1975
Gasterosteus aculeatus The male constructs a nest of small twigs, algae or plant debris typically over a sandy or mud bottom Nest built by male Bradbury, 1999
Gasterosteus aculeatus Male constructs a nest Nest built by male Belanger, 1987
Gasterosteus aculeatus Spawn naturally in the nest of a male No category Wootton, 1973
Gasterosteus aculeatus "Following construction of a pit in a sandy substratum, the male lays down a mat of filamentous algae and other vegetation, may cover this partly with substratum carried to the nes by mouth, and finally, forms a tunnel through which the female can pass during spawning. Nest materials are secured by a ""glue"", produced in the kidney, that contains a glycoprotein, Spiggin, the secretion of which is under the control of androgenic hormone" No category Barber, 2000
Gasterosteus aculeatus Breeding males defend their nests in a fixed territory and care for the eggs and offpsring. The kidney of the male secretes a protein glue thatis used in nest building No category Sokolowska and Sokolowska, 2006
Gasterosteus aculeatus Eggs are deposited in nest built on mud, sand, vegetation, or flat surface of a rock, also scattered onto vegetation Susbtrate chooser Goodyear, 1982
Gasterosteus aculeatus To examine growth of the fish, 167 progeny hatched from three nests No category Mori and Magoshi, 1987
Pungitius pungitius Male built a nest with parts of aquatic plants Nest built by male Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Pungitius pungitius Male builts a nest among aqutic plants, using piece of plants Nest built by male Lafaille and Feunteun, 2001
Pungitius pungitius The male builts the nest with plant fragments and binds it together with a kidney secretion Nest built by male Fishbase, 2006
Pungitius pungitius Both sex are aggresive in breeding season. The male builts a nest, usually off the bottom, in the plants, using fragments of aquatic vegetation bound together (gluing) by the threadlike, kidney secretion that hardens on contact with water Ambiguous Scott and Crossman, 1973
Pungitius pungitius The sexually mature male establishes a territory on or near the substrate and then builts a nest No category Fitzgerald, 1983
Pungitius pungitius Male builds nest Nest built by male Environment agency, 1996
Pungitius pungitius Nest spawner No category Balon, 1975
Pungitius pungitius Male have territories and have nests No category Ah-King, 2004
Pungitius pungitius Males construct a nest made of algae and other plants debris. Nest built by male Bradbury, 1999
Pungitius pungitius Eggs incubate in nest constructed of fine plant fragments held together by secretions of the male No category Goodyear, 1982
Pungitius pungitius In the nest of a single male No category Heins, 2003
Ambloplites rupestris Excavations buried on the ground No category Billard, 1997
Ambloplites rupestris A nest is built No category Carrel, 2001
Ambloplites rupestris The male digs a shallow nest Susbtrate chooser Scott and Crossman, 1973
Ambloplites rupestris Nesters Nest built by both parents Fishbase, 2006
Ambloplites rupestris Male constructs a nest [Male extablish territories which each male constructs its nest. Nesting territories are aggressively defended from other fish] Nest built by male Gross and Nowell, 1980
Ambloplites rupestris Male clear shawllow depression up to 0.6 m in diameter No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Ambloplites rupestris Nest spawner No category Balon, 1975
Ambloplites rupestris Eggs are deposited in shallow depression excavated Susbtrate chooser Goodyear, 1982
Ambloplites rupestris Males in our study excavated nests larger than do lakes fish No category Noltie and Keenleyside, 1987
Lepomis gibbosus Males construct nests in close proximity Nest built by male Internet, 2005
Lepomis gibbosus Excavation constructs by both parents Nest built by both parents Billard, 1997
Lepomis gibbosus Nests are built on any susbtrates Susbtrate chooser Carrel, 2001
Lepomis gibbosus Male built a nest, which is a shallow depressions Nest built by male Scott and Crossman, 1973
Lepomis gibbosus Males build the nest No category Fishbase, 2006
Lepomis gibbosus Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Lepomis gibbosus Nest diameter usually two times length of the male No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Lepomis gibbosus Built nest No category Rue, 2001
Lepomis gibbosus Nest spawner No category Balon, 1975
Lepomis gibbosus Male buils and defend nests Nest built by male Dembski, 2006
Lepomis gibbosus Nest is always among vegetation No category Goodyear, 1982
Lepomis gibbosus Eggs were collected from June 1-10, 1996, by placing clay tiles in nests of male pumpkinseed Nest built by male Arendt and Wilson, 2000
Micropterus dolomieui Male constructs a nest 30-60 cm diameter in shallow water Nest built by male Internet, 2005
Micropterus dolomieui Male builts a nest Nest built by male Billard, 1997
Micropterus dolomieui The male builts the nest Nest built by male Fishbase, 2006
Micropterus dolomieui The male builts a nest (18.3-30.5 cm) in diameter Nest built by male Scott and Crossman, 1973
Micropterus dolomieui Nest-building species No category Rue, 2001
Micropterus dolomieui The male sweeps the nest clean with his tail and occasionally carries stones and othe rmaterials from the nest area No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Micropterus dolomieui Nest spawner No category Balon, 1975
Micropterus dolomieui Sweep out a nest site in the substrate with their caudal fin No category Ridgway, 1989
Micropterus dolomieui Breeding adult males inhabit the littoral zone and built large, conspicuous nests No category Gillooly and Baylis, 1999
Micropterus dolomieui Eggs are deposited in a nest, a shallow depression excavated in cleaned gravel, rock, rubble, or sand, spawning may also occur on harbor breakwalls Susbtrate chooser Goodyear, 1982
Micropterus dolomieui Although most males spawned once in a single nest, one male spawned in two nests (about 0.5 m apart) simultaneously and four males renested and spawned while their initial brood was at the juvenile interval Susbtrate chooser Knotek and Orth, 1998
Micropterus salmoides Male construct a nest Nest built by male Spillmann, 1961
Micropterus salmoides Male buid a nest in the spring when the temperature reaches 15-24°C Nest built by male Heidinger, 1976
Micropterus salmoides Little nesting will be observed before water temperatures average 15.5 No category Newburg, 1975
Micropterus salmoides The males construct a nest, usually a depression near the shore Nest built by male Internet, 2005
Micropterus salmoides Male built a nest Nest built by male Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Micropterus salmoides Built a nest No category Carrel and Schlumberger, 2001
Micropterus salmoides The male which becomes aggressive and territorial builts the nest No category Fishbase, 2006
Micropterus salmoides Nest building by very aggressive and territorial males, nest are 61.0-91.5 cm in diameter, and depending on the hardness of the bottom 25-303 mm deep No category Scott and Crossman, 1973
Micropterus salmoides Both zygotes and embryos are maintained in a nest] No category Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Micropterus salmoides Nest spawner No category Balon, 1975
Micropterus salmoides Nest builder [One or two days prior to egg laying the male largemouth bass selects a nest which is often situated near the protection of rocks, stumps, logs or weeds] No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Micropterus salmoides Eggs are deposited in a nest made in almost any substrate, including gravel, rock, clay, sand, mud, detritus, or vegetation, soft substrate is excavated down to firm bottom, may spawn over nests of rock bass Susbtrate chooser Goodyear, 1982
Dicentrarchus labrax Open water/susbtratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Dicentrarchus labrax Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Morone americana Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Morone americana Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Morone chrysops Open water/ substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Morone chrysops The eggs are released near the surface or in midwater Open water/substratum scatter Scott and Crossman, 1973
Morone chrysops No nest construction Open water/substratum scatter Kohler, 1997
Morone chrysops Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Morone chrysops Eggs are scattered at random at surface or in mid-water No category Goodyear, 1982
Morone saxatilis Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Morone saxatilis Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Gymnocephalus cernuus Eggs are deposited on plants or rocks Susbtrate chooser Billard, 1997
Gymnocephalus cernuus Open water/ substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Gymnocephalus cernuus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Gymnocephalus cernuus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Perca flavescens No nest is built Open water/substratum scatter Heidinger and Kayes, 1986
Perca flavescens No nest is built Open water/substratum scatter Scott and Crossman, 1973
Perca flavescens Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Perca flavescens Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Perca flavescens Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Perca fluviatilis No No category Thorpe, 1977
Perca fluviatilis No No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Perca fluviatilis No No category Craig, 2000
Perca fluviatilis No No category Dalimier, 1982
Perca fluviatilis Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Perca fluviatilis Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Mann, 1996
Perca fluviatilis Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Perca fluviatilis No male spawning territory No category Ah-King, 2004
Sander lucioperca Males build nests, exposes plants roots on which the eggs are later deposited and where they stick Susbtrate chooser Craig, 2000
Sander lucioperca In the spawning ground, males build nests by cleaning it from mud. The nest has a dimaeter of 0.5 m and depth of a depth of 5-10 cm [Sometimes nest contains plant roots and other plant material] No category Lappaleinen, 2003
Sander lucioperca Male build a rudimentary nest and keeps it clean Nest built by male Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Sander lucioperca Nesters Nest built by both parents Fishbase, 2006
Sander lucioperca Male builts the nest Nest built by male Deeler and Willemsen, 1964
Sander lucioperca Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Sander lucioperca Nest No category Environment agency, 1996
Sander lucioperca Nest spawner No category Balon, 1975
Sander lucioperca Nest No category Ah-King, 2004
Sander lucioperca The males built nests of 0.5 m in diameter, at a depth of 5-10 cm No category Lehtonen, 1996
Sander lucioperca Spawning takes place in a nest that is previously prepared by the male No category Poulet, 2005
Sander lucioperca He guards the nest and attracts one female, after a 'mating dance' No category Schlumberger and Proteau, 1996
Sander lucioperca Shortly after spawning, each nest was transported in plastic bags No category Wang, 2009
Sander vitreus Do not build nests, eggs are broadcast onto suitable susbrates Open water/substratum scatter Malison and Held, 1996b
Sander vitreus No nest is built Open water/substratum scatter Scott and Crossman, 1973
Sander vitreus Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Sander vitreus Male are not territorial and no nest is built [Eggs are broadcast at random over suitable substrate] Open water/substratum scatter Kerr and Grant, 1999
Sander vitreus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Sander vitreus They do not fan nests like other similar species, but instead broadcast eggs over oepn ground, which reduces their ability to survive environmental stresses Open water/substratum scatter Anonymous, 2006 Chapter 3
Sander vitreus Broadcast spawner, no territories Open water/substratum scatter Ah-King, 2004
Coregonus lavaretus Non-territorial species where males neither fight for females nor dig spawning ditches Susbtrate chooser Skurdal, 1985
Coregonus lavaretus Open water/substratum egg scatteres Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Coregonus lavaretus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Coregonus lavaretus Male do not defend territories No category Ah-King, 2004
Coregonus lavaretus Open susbstratum spawner No category Kamler, 1996
Coregonus albula Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Coregonus albula Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Coregonus albula Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Kamler, 1996
Coregonus clupeaformis Eggs are deposited more or less randomly over the spanwing grounds by the parents Susbtrate chooser Scott and Crossman, 1973
Coregonus clupeaformis Open water/substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Coregonus clupeaformis Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Coregonus clupeaformis Eggs are broadcast near surface Open water/substratum scatter Goodyear, 1982
Coregonus clupeaformis Eggs are brodcast into the water column No category Bradbury, 1999
Hucho hucho Female dig a nest Susbtrate chooser Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Hucho hucho Eggs are buried within 40 cm deep No category Perrin, 2001
Hucho hucho Female dig a nest 30-40 cm deep, and 120-150 cm wide Susbtrate chooser Jatteau, 1991
Hucho hucho Female dig a nest [Brood hiders] Susbtrate chooser Fishbase, 2006
Hucho hucho Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Hucho hucho The female is aided by the male in making a nest 120-150 cm in width and 3040 cm in depth, in the bottom of the river No category Witokowski and Kokurewicz, 1981
Hucho hucho Female sets to work to scoop out a shallow, saucer-like depression, 25-60 cm deep, by means of vigorous, flapping movements of her body and tail, may take several days [During the spawning period, the males are generally very fierce, driving away intruders with great pugnacity and vigour, or engagin in formal combats with other males] No category Prawochensky and Kolder, 1968
Hucho hucho Nest by females Best build by female Fleming, 1998
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Starts defending nesting territories as soon as they have moved on breeding grounds No category Groot, 1996
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha It is the female that prepares the nest or rFemaledd [The males are aggessive to other males (female are to females also, but to a lesser extend)] No category Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha The female buids the redd by lying on one side and using its tail, it deplace silt and light gravel to produce a deep trough Ambiguous Fishbase, 2006
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Upon establishing a territory, the female constructs, spawns in, and covers a series of nests (three to eight), and then defends these from other females until her death days to weeks later Nest built by male Hamon, 1999
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha The female digs a redd Susbtrate chooser Kwain, 1982
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Nest by female Best build by female Fleming, 1998
Oncorhynchus keta Female dig nest Susbtrate chooser Groot, 1996
Oncorhynchus keta The female prepares the redd by facing upstream [The male are aggressive on the spawning grounds] Susbtrate chooser Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus keta The female excavates a hole of around 1 meter diameter and 50 cm depth before spawning occur No category Fishbase, 2006
Oncorhynchus keta Females excavate a redd by lying on their sides and lashing the tail [in some cases no redd is excavated and eggs are shed over and between boulders] Susbtrate chooser Coad, 2006
Oncorhynchus keta Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Oncorhynchus keta The female chum salmon excavates the redd in gravel by turning to one side and rapidly flexing her body, creating water current and removing gravel with the caudal fin Susbtrate chooser Pauley, 1988
Oncorhynchus keta Females passed through three spawning phases: Phase 1, spawning lasted 2 to 4 days and consisted of preparation of the redd, deposition of eggs, guarding the redd, and association with one or more males Susbtrate chooser Bakkala, 1970
Oncorhynchus keta Upon establishing a territory, the female constructs, spawns in, and covers a series of nests (three to eight), and then defends these from other females until her death days to weeks later Nest built by male Hamon, 1999
Oncorhynchus keta Spawning behavior in both chum salmon and rainbow trout consists of a combination of nest building by the female and courtship display by the male, leading to deposition of fertilized eggs in the nest [more details provided in the article] No category Tautz and Groot, 1975
Oncorhynchus keta Nest built by female No category Fleming, 1998
Oncorhynchus kisutch Female prepared nets in area with ground water seepage at the head of a riffle No category Groot, 1996
Oncorhynchus kisutch The nest is built by the female [Male and female are very aggressive on the spawning grounds] No category Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus kisutch The female finds a spot and digs a pitt [At this point she is aggresive toward other females] Susbtrate chooser Fishbase, 2006
Oncorhynchus kisutch Once a site is selected, the females begins to construct a shallow depression in the gravel with her tail No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Oncorhynchus kisutch Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Oncorhynchus kisutch Upon establishing a territory, the female constructs, spawns in, and covers a series of nests (three to eight), and then defends these from other females until her death days to weeks later Nest built by male Hamon, 1999
Oncorhynchus kisutch Nest made by females No category Fleming, 1998
Oncorhynchus mykiss Nest building continues day and night and genrally the female gis several nests (two to five) in succession No category Groot, 1996
Oncorhynchus mykiss The female finds a spot and digs a pitt Susbtrate chooser Fishbase, 2006
Oncorhynchus mykiss The female digs a redd Susbtrate chooser Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus mykiss A female excavates a redd by lying on her side and thrashing her tail Susbtrate chooser Coad, 2006
Oncorhynchus mykiss Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Oncorhynchus mykiss Spawning behavior in both chum salmon and rainbow trout consists of a combination of nest building by the female and courtship display by the male, leading to deposition of fertilized eggs in the nest [more details provided in the article] No category Tautz and Groot, 1975
Oncorhynchus mykiss Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Kamler, 1996
Oncorhynchus mykiss The digging of spawning pit is exclusively a phase of female behavior Susbtrate chooser Greeley, 1932
Oncorhynchus mykiss Nest by female Best build by female Fleming, 1998
Oncorhynchus nerka In the afternoon, females prepare the nest No category Groot, 1996
Oncorhynchus nerka The female prepares a nest [On the spawning grounds the male (and sometimes the female) is aggressive to other spawning males] No category Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus nerka Female digs a nest [Agressive behaviour of both males and females] Susbtrate chooser Fishbase, 2006
Oncorhynchus nerka Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Oncorhynchus nerka Eggs are deposited in redd Susbtrate chooser Goodyear, 1982
Oncorhynchus nerka Upon establishing a territory, the female constructs, spawns in, and covers a series of nests (three to eight), and then defends these from other females until her death days to weeks later Nest built by male Hamon, 1999
Oncorhynchus nerka Nest by female Best build by female Fleming, 1998
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Large redds (nests) are constructed by the females Susbtrate chooser Internet, 2005
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Females built nests, and that actively defend No category Chebanov and Riddell, 1998
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha The female digs the redd [The males and females are aggressive on the spawning grounds] Susbtrate chooser Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Once a female selects a spot, she begins to dig a nest, driving away other females during the period of nest building Susbtrate chooser Fishbase, 2006
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha The female begins to construt a shallow depression in the gravel with her tail No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Eggs are deposited in redd dug in substrate Susbtrate chooser Goodyear, 1982
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Upon establishing a territory, the female constructs, spawns in, and covers a series of nests (three to eight), and then defends these from other females until her death days to weeks later Nest built by male Hamon, 1999
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Bury their eggsin gravel redds generally during the fall Susbtrate chooser Heming, 1982
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Nesting by females No category Fleming, 1998
Salmo salar The female selects a suitable gournd, and then digs a nest of about 15 cm deep Susbtrate chooser Groot, 1996
Salmo salar Female digs one up to five excavations in the ground depending on the number of male Susbtrate chooser Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Salmo salar Female digs nest Susbtrate chooser Dumas and Darolles, 1999
Salmo salar The female selects a site where the gravel is of the correct size and of sufficient depth No category Fishbase, 2006
Salmo salar The female uses her caudal fin like a paddle and excavates a nesting depression (the redd) [The actual nesting site is chosen by the remale] Susbtrate chooser Scott and Crossman, 1973
Salmo salar The female begins to construct a shallow depression in the gravel with her tail No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Salmo salar Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Salmo salar Eggs are deposited in the gravel nest or redd where they incubate over winter Susbtrate chooser Bradbury, 1999
Salmo salar Each female constructed 7 to 11 nests over a period of 3 to 5 days [In other studies, atlantic salmon build larger numbers of redds and nests, with some females constructing from 8 to 17 seperate nests within 1 to 9 redds] Ambiguous de Gaudemar, 2000
Salmo salar Females bury their eggs in the gravel substrate in several excavated depression called nests [Males search for females and defend them against potential rivals by attacks and threat displays but do not participate in the choice and construction of redds] Ambiguous de Gaudemar et Beall, 1999
Salmo salar Female digs a nest Susbtrate chooser Bensettiti and Gaudillat, 2002
Salmo salar Nesting by female No category Fleming, 1998
Salmo salar Bury their eggs No category Johnston and McLay, 1997
Salmo trutta fario The female dig few nests Susbtrate chooser Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Salmo trutta fario The female chooses the nest site and prepares the nest No category Groot, 1996
Salmo trutta fario Female dig nest Susbtrate chooser Ombredane, 2001
Salmo trutta fario Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Fishbase, 2006
Salmo trutta fario The female creates a shallowo depression (redd) in the gravel Susbtrate chooser Scott and Crossman, 1973
Salmo trutta fario Zygotes are placed in a special habitat (e.g. scattered on vegetation, or buried in gravel) Susbtrate chooser Vila-Gispert and Moreno-Amich, 2002
Salmo trutta fario The female excavates a saucer-shaped nest in the gravel No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Salmo trutta fario Eggs are buried in substrates No category Billard, 1997
Salmo trutta fario Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Salmo trutta fario Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Kamler, 1996
Salmo trutta fario The digging of spawning pit is exclusively a phase of female behavior [Both male and female trout defend the redd against other fish in the period just preceding spawning] Susbtrate chooser Greeley, 1932
Salmo trutta fario Nest by female Best build by female Fleming, 1998
Salmo trutta fario Cleaning of a restricted bed area from fine sediments is also achieved by digging salmonid females, which build spawning redds up to 30 cm depth, ensuring sufficient oxygenation of the deposited eggs and for developing larvae after hatching Susbtrate chooser Meyer, 2008
Salvelinus alpinus Several nests, constitue by gravels, could be construct by female No category Guillard, 1992
Salvelinus alpinus Female dig as many as 8 to 10 nests before all the eggs have been laid Susbtrate chooser Groot, 1996
Salvelinus alpinus No nests, but females lay their eggs on the substrates Ambiguous Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Salvelinus alpinus Once a spot is selected, a female starts digging a redd Susbtrate chooser Fishbase, 2006
Salvelinus alpinus Although the males establish and guard territories, the nest or redd is prepared by the female who uses her caudal fin, paddle-like, to clear debris from the site Susbtrate chooser Scott and Crossman, 1973
Salvelinus alpinus The female selects a suitable site and digs a redd using her body and tail Susbtrate chooser Kerr and Grant, 1999
Salvelinus alpinus Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Salvelinus alpinus Females dug a redd before laying their eggs and covered it by tail beats after fertilization [Arctic charr females in the lakes Onage and Ladoga, Russia, did not bury their eggs after spawning but the eggs were freely spread among the rocks and gravel. Susbtrate chooser Huuskonen, 2003
Salvelinus alpinus Females dig a nest or redd in the loose gravel where the eggs incubate over winter Susbtrate chooser Bradbury, 1999
Salvelinus alpinus Males fight intensively in the spawning area, and one large, dominant male may fertilize the eggs of several consecutive females within the same territory No category Jonsson and Hindar, 1982
Salvelinus fontinalis Lay their eggs in gravel nests called redds Susbtrate chooser Mirza, 2001
Salvelinus fontinalis Lay eggs in nests and recovered by gravels No category Billard, 1997
Salvelinus fontinalis Lay their eggs in gravel nests Susbtrate chooser Rivier, 2001
Salvelinus fontinalis A receptive female chooses a spot and digs a redd Susbtrate chooser Fishbase, 2006
Salvelinus fontinalis The female clears away debris and silt from the nesting area by a series of repid fanning movements of the caudal fin made while on her side No category Scott and Crossman, 1973
Salvelinus fontinalis Redd, egg pocket Susbtrate chooser Snucins, 1992
Salvelinus fontinalis Redd Susbtrate chooser Curry, 1991
Salvelinus fontinalis During spawning, the female digs and cleans a shallow nest or redd in which the eggs are deposited Susbtrate chooser Bradbury, 1999
Salvelinus fontinalis The female begins building a redd by fanning the finer particles of the substrate with her tail Susbtrate chooser Kerr and Grant, 1999
Salvelinus fontinalis Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Salvelinus fontinalis Redds Susbtrate chooser Hausle and Coble, 1976
Salvelinus fontinalis The digging of spawning pit is exclusively a phase of female behavior [Both male and female trout defend the redd against other fish in the period just preceding spawning] Susbtrate chooser Greeley, 1932
Salvelinus fontinalis Nest by female Best build by female Fleming, 1998
Salvelinus namaycush Open water / substratum egg scatterers [Males reach spawning beds first and spend some time cleaning the rocks] Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Salvelinus namaycush Cleaning of the spawning grounds consisted of brushing the rocks with body or tail fin, or rubbing then with the snout No category Scott and Crossman, 1973
Salvelinus namaycush The males appear to clean the rocks with her tails but do not build a nest No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Salvelinus namaycush Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Balon, 1975
Salvelinus namaycush No nest Open water/substratum scatter Fleming, 1998
Stenodus leucichthys Open water / substratum egg scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006
Stenodus leucichthys The eggs are shed on the river bottom No category Coad, 2006
Stenodus leucichthys Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Thymallus thymallus No, eggs are only buried No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Thymallus thymallus Biggest grayling was strougly territorial, other males did not appear to defend territories No category Poncin, 1996
Thymallus thymallus Eggs are deposited Susbtrate chooser Billard, 1997
Thymallus thymallus Brood hiders Susbtrate chooser Fishbase, 2006
Thymallus thymallus Brood hiders, bury their eggs under several centimetres of substratum in gravel nests Susbtrate chooser Sempeski and Gaudin, 1995
Thymallus thymallus Dig shallow spawning pits (about 5 cm) compared to other salmonids Susbtrate chooser Meyer, 2001
Thymallus thymallus Spawning territories set up by the males No category Northcote, 1993
Thymallus thymallus Eggs are deposited on the gravel Susbtrate chooser Maitland, 1977
Thymallus thymallus The males defend a territory No category Ah-King, 2004
Thymallus thymallus Egg-burial is a simple form of parental care No category Willson, 1997
Thymallus thymallus Eggs are buried but not deep within the substrate [No nest is built] Open water/substratum scatter Bardonnet and Gaudin, 1990
Thymallus thymallus During spawning, eggs are deposited a few centimetres below the gravel surface Susbtrate chooser Gregersen, 2008
Thymallus thymallus L'extremité de la caudale de la femelle est recourbée et s'enfonce par des mouvements vibratoires dans la gravier. No category Vivier, 1958
Thymallus arcticus Brood hiders, no redd is constructed, but the vibrations of the tails during the spawning act stirs up the substrate and produce a slight depression Susbtrate chooser Fishbase, 2006
Thymallus arcticus No actual nest or redd is prepared [Male are territorial on the spawning grounds] Susbtrate chooser Scott and Crossman, 1973
Thymallus arcticus Altough redds are not constructed or covered by the female, in some cases shallow pits may appear in the stream as a result of prespawning activity [Males set up and hold spawning territories of 6-7 m²] Susbtrate chooser Northcote, 1995
Thymallus arcticus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Thymallus arcticus Males set up and hold spawning territories of 6 to 7 m² rather than defending access to female [Redds are not constructed by females] Susbtrate chooser Northcote, 1993
Thymallus arcticus The eggs are buried to a depth of 2-3 cm despite the absence of nest digging behavior Susbtrate chooser Kratt and Smith, 1977
Thymallus arcticus No redd was formed, but the eggs were covered by the loosened bottom material Susbtrate chooser Bishop, 1971
Thymallus arcticus During the spawning period, male grayling defended rectangular-shaped territories approximatively 2.5 to 3 m wide and 3.5 to 4.5 m long [Female did not hold territories on the spawning ground] No category Kratt and Smith, 1980
Cottus gobio Male built a nest Nest built by male Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Cottus gobio Eggs are deposited under stones Susbtrate chooser Billard, 1997
Cottus gobio Eggs are depositied under the shleter of the male No category Persat, 2001
Cottus gobio Nesters, eggs are deposited below a stone Ambiguous Fishbase, 2006
Cottus gobio It uses cavities underneath stones for nesting. The ripe female enter the male's nest and lays her eggs on the ceiling No category Knaepkens, 2004
Cottus gobio During the breeding season, the male excavates a cavity under a stone, the ripe female enters the nest and lay an egg mass on its ceiling No category Marconato and Bisazza, 1988
Cottus gobio The male excavates a nest under a suitable large stone to attract female No category Tomlinson and Perrow, 2003
Ameiurus nebulosus Nests are excavated by either the female or both parents Nest built by both parents Internet, 2005
Ameiurus nebulosus Nests are built by one or both sexes Nest built by both parents Fishbase, 2006
Ameiurus nebulosus One or both sexes clear a shallow nest Nest built by both parents Scott and Crossman, 1973
Ameiurus nebulosus One or both sexes clear s shallow nest Nest built by both parents Kerr and Grant, 1999
Ameiurus nebulosus Nests are excavated No category Rue, 2001
Ameiurus nebulosus Eggs are deposited in depression or burrow, nest is excavated down, nests also made Susbtrate chooser Goodyear, 1982
Ameiurus nebulosus Nests, which consists of shallow depressions or burrows, are genrally built at depths of less than 1 meter over a firm sand substratum. Both sexes are involved in nest preparation and in the care and defense of the yuong, although they usually have somewhat different roles. Nest built by both parents Internet, 2001
Ictalurus punctatus Nests are constructed by one or both parents among the crevices and holes in the rocky jetties Nest built by both parents Internet, 2005
Ictalurus punctatus The pair builds a depression in the ground No category Fishbase, 2006
Ictalurus punctatus Nests built by the male Nest built by male Scott and Crossman, 1973
Ictalurus punctatus Male, chooses a spawning, removes silt from the spawning site and defends a territory established around the nest area No category Grizzle, 1985
Ictalurus punctatus The male typically prepares a nest by clearing soft mud and debris from an esaily protected area No category Wellborn and Tucker, 1985
Ictalurus punctatus Male buids nest Nest built by male Kerr and Grant, 1999
Ictalurus punctatus Built nest No category Rue, 2001
Ictalurus punctatus Eggs are deposited in nest or burrow made in crevices Susbtrate chooser Goodyear, 1982
Ictalurus punctatus Male typically prepares a nest by clearing soft mud and debris from an easily protected area No category Legendre, 1997
Silurus glanis Substratum choosers No category Balon, 1975
Silurus glanis Males buries a nest Nest built by male The Halyn Publishing Group limited, 1976
Silurus glanis Eggs are deposited in a hole within the ground Susbtrate chooser Billard, 1997
Silurus glanis The male cleans the nest and after a period of courtship spawning takes place Nest built by male Legendre, 1997
Silurus glanis Male clear an area No category Schlumberger and Proteau, 2001
Silurus glanis The male opens out a depression in the bottom No category Alp, 2004
Silurus glanis Male spawing territories No category Ah-King, 2004
Silurus glanis Clutch tenders No category Fishbase, 2006
Silurus glanis Artifical nests installed in spawning grounds No category Brzuska and Adamek, 1999
Osmerus eperlanus Does not make nests No category Belyanina, 1969
Osmerus eperlanus Open substratum spawner Open water/substratum scatter Balon, 1975
Osmerus eperlanus Eggs are deposited Susbtrate chooser Billard, 1997
Osmerus eperlanus Open water/substratum eggs scatterers Open water/substratum scatter Fishbase, 2006