Spawning conditions - Homing



Species Primary Data Secondary Data References
Alosa alosa Adults usually migrate in the streams where they were born Present Bensettiti and Gaudillat, 2002
Alosa alosa Although there is some evidence of homing in shads, it it not known if adults return to their natal rivers or the same gravels over which they have previously spawned Present Maitland and Hatton-Ellis, 2000
Alosa alosa Seem to return to their natal stream Present Belaud, 2001
Alosa fallax Presence of homing, more pronounced than that of Alosa alosa Present Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Alosa fallax Although there is some evidence of homing in shads, it it not known if adults return to their natal rivers or the same gravels over which they have previously spawned Present Maitland and Hatton-Ellis, 2000
Alosa sapidissima The american shad is reported to home to its natal river to spawn Present Carscadden and Leggett, 1975
Alosa sapidissima Most sexually mature fish return to natal streams to spawn Present Olney, 2001
Alosa sapidissima To their natal streams to spawn Present Mills, 2004
Alosa sapidissima Return to its natal river to spawn Present Bradbury, 1999
Alosa sapidissima Return to their natal stram to spawn Present Dodson and Legget, 1973
Alosa sapidissima Our life history and meristic data suggest that homing to a tributary within a river system was also occuring [Adlys shad do not feed during the freswater migration and this lack of food would accentuate the effects of temperature and distance of migrating fish) Present Carscadden and Legget, 1975
Aspius aspius Tendendy to return to the same spawning ground (reproductive homing) Present Fredrich, 2003
Barbus barbus Homing is present Present Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Barbus barbus Homing is present Present Agence de l'eau,
Chondrostoma nasus It was used by the same individuals repeatedly from year to year Absent Keckeis, 2001
Leuciscus cephalus Kind of homing has been suggested Present Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Leuciscus cephalus Tendendy to return to the same spawning ground (reproductive homing) Present Fredrich, 2003
Leuciscus idus It was observed that individuals spawn on the same places as in previous years. Thus, homing was reported for ide, similarly as for salmonid (and same other) fish Present Witkowski, 1997
Leuciscus idus Displaying a homing behaviour Present Kuliskova, 2009
Leuciscus leuciscus Spawning areas are not fixed Present Spillmann, 1961
Leuciscus leuciscus Tendendy to return to the same spawning ground (reproductive homing) Present Fredrich, 2003
Rutilus rutilus Fish tend to return on their spawning site Present Rinchard, 1996
Rutilus rutilus "Roach have ""fixed spawning grounds"", which they use annualy" Present Diamond, 1985
Rutilus rutilus Show a certain degree of homing Present Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Rutilus rutilus Return with 90.2% precision to their home tributary for subsequent spawnings Present Vollestad, 1987
Rutilus rutilus Tendendy to return to the same spawning ground (reproductive homing) Present Fredrich, 2003
Esox masquinongy At Stony Lake, muskellunge do home to particular grounds Present Crossman, 1990
Esox masquinongy Reproductive homing to the same spawning area from year to year is reported Present Kerr and Grant, 1999
Esox masquinongy Adults tend to return to the same spawning locations each year Present Pennslylvania fishes, 2006
Esox masquinongy Reproductive and nonreproductive homing behavior Present Miller and Menzel, 1986
Esox masquinongy Spawning sites fidelity was observed for radiotracked muskellunge through returns to locations over two successive years. Subsequent data on tagging and recapture of trapnetted spawning adults corroborates this finding. Of 33 fish tagged and recaptured during spawning over many years, all were recaptured at the location of original of original tagging Present Farrell, 2005
Esox lucius The fish exibited no homing tendency for particular spawning grounds Present Souchon, 1983
Esox lucius "Kind of ""homing"" in a sense of returning repeatedly to spawn in the same place" Present Frost and Kipling, 1967
Esox lucius The fish exibited no homing tendency for particular spawning grounds Present Franklin and Smith, 1963
Esox lucius The degree of homing instinct to previously used spawning sites is unclear for this species Present Kerr and Grant, 1999
Lota lota "Migrate to their ""home stream"" every year" Present Van Houdt, 2003
Micropterus dolomieui Nest building usually occurs within 150 years of where his nest was built in previous years Absent Fishbase, 2006
Micropterus dolomieui Some males return to the same nest in subsequent years and over 85% of them return to within 150 years of where they nested in previous years Present Scott and Crossman, 1973
Micropterus dolomieui Homing tendencies are also displayed by smallmouth bass in stream environment Present Kerr and Grant, 1999
Micropterus salmoides Not described Absent Heidinger, 1976
Micropterus salmoides Home ranges Present Mesing and Wickler, 1986
Morone saxatilis Return to their natal river in the spring to spawn Present Burdick and Hightower, 2005
Morone saxatilis These fish return to wintering areas prior to entering home streams to spawn Present Dudley, 1977
Perca flavescens Return to their local location to spawn Present Craig, 2000
Perca fluviatilis "Not well established, but once ""home range"" has been recorded" Present Thorpe, 1977
Sander lucioperca Homing of pikeperch to a certain spawning area is well developped based on tagging experiment Present Lappaleinen, 2003
Sander lucioperca Some return to natal spawning have been described Present Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Sander lucioperca Tend to return to the same spawning place next year Present Deeler and Willemsen, 1964
Sander vitreus Mature walleyes tend to return to the same spawning grounds year after year Present Colby, 1979
Sander vitreus Return to their local location to spawn Present Craig, 2000
Sander vitreus Reproductive homing to the same spawning site is known to occur Present Kerr and Grant, 1999
Hucho hucho Seem to display the same homing of salmon Present Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Hucho hucho Homing behavior Present Jatteau, 1991
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Natal streams Present Beacham and Murray, 1986
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Although some adult return to their natal streams to spawn, the rate of straying amon pink salmon is believed to be much higher than in any other species of salmon Present Bradbury, 1999
Oncorhynchus keta Return to the home river Present Groot, 1996
Oncorhynchus keta Considered to exhibit a strong tendency to home to the natal stream but the degree to which they wander is not well know Present Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus keta They return to spawn in the stream from which they originated [Share the strong homing tendencies of other species] Present Bakkala, 1970
Oncorhynchus keta Return to the stream in which they hatched Present Pauley, 1988
Oncorhynchus keta Return to spawn to their natal streams Present Beacham and Murray, 1987
Oncorhynchus kisutch Migrates late in the season and over a prolonged period: from earlt September to early October Absent Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus kisutch Returns to natal stream to spawn Present Kerr and Grant, 1999
Oncorhynchus mykiss Generally there is a high degree of homing by spawning adults Present Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus mykiss Fish return to natal streams to spawn as mature adults Present Tipping, 1991
Oncorhynchus nerka The homing ability of sockeye salmon is well documented and straying is genrally 2% or less Present Groot, 1996
Oncorhynchus nerka After reaching a home lake they go to the natal river (usually an inlet) to spawn Present Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus nerka Return to natal stream to spawn Present Fishbase, 2006
Oncorhynchus nerka Sockeye salmon are thought to be especially precise in homing, because they return to and spawn in habitats associated with a lake wehre their offpsring rear for one or more years before migrating to the sea Present Youngand Woody, 2007
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Return to their natal river Present Slater, 1994
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Homing Present Porcher and Baglinière, 2001
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Chinook return to their home stream to spawn Present Kerr and Grant, 1999
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Homing tendency to Pacific salmon to their natal stream Present Murray and Beacham, 1987
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha We assumed that the chinook salmon were all homing to their rivers of origin Present Berman and Quinn, 1991
Salmo salar Return to their home river to spawn Present Groot, 1996
Salmo salar Present [But not as strict as sometimes think] Present Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Salmo salar Salmon return to their home rivers and if possible to the area where they hatched and spent their initial freshwater parr life Present Fishbase, 2006
Salmo salar Salmon and trout tend to return from the sea to the river of their birth [Within the river system these anadromous fish and resident trout seek to return to their natal tributary to spawn] Present Crisp, 1996
Salmo salar Have a remarkable ability to return to the stream from which they originally came Present Kerr and Grant, 1999
Salmo salar Return to their natal river to undergo spawning for the first time Present Bradbury, 1999
Salmo salar Return to their natal streams to spawn Present de Gaudemar, 2000
Salmo salar As adults, Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. return from the sea to their home river for spawning Present Okland, 2001
Salmo trutta fario Homing is present Present Ombredane, 2001
Salmo trutta fario Salmon and trout tend to return from the sea to the river of their birth [Within the river system these anadromous fish and resident trout seek to return to their natal tributary to spawn] Present Crisp, 1996
Salmo trutta fario Return to their natal stream to spawn Present Landergren and Vallin, 1998
Salvelinus alpinus Homing is relatively strong and many return to the home stream for the first and subsequent spawnings Present Groot, 1996
Salvelinus alpinus Homing has been observed Present Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Salvelinus alpinus There is a strong tendency for spawning charr to return to the spawning grounds from which they originated Present Kerr and Grant, 1999
Salvelinus alpinus Exhibited a high degree of homing to their natal rivers Present Bradbury, 1999
Salvelinus alpinus Observe them returning to their natal river Present Moore, 1975
Salvelinus fontinalis Tag recaptures from fish tagged several years suggest that brrok trout spawn each year at the same spawning bed Present Fraser, 1985
Salvelinus fontinalis Enter their natal stream in spring and summer even though spawning occur in fall Present Coad, 2006
Salvelinus namaycush In certain lakes, he returns to natal spawning grounds Present Perrin, 2001
Salvelinus namaycush Evidence of homing Present Scott and Crossman, 1973
Thymallus thymallus Behavior homing Present Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Thymallus thymallus High rates of homing in grayling in the basin of the Upper Volga Present Pavlov, 1998
Thymallus thymallus No certain, but in other areas grayligng ascened the same tributary year after year during their spawning runs Present Parkinson, 1999
Thymallus thymallus In all fish marked in that year, as many as 18.7% came back to spawn to their home stream Present Witkowski and Kowalewski, 1988
Thymallus thymallus When mature, the grayling return to their natal streams with great precision to spawn Present Haugen and Vollestad, 2000
Thymallus thymallus 240 of 284 (84%) grayling recaptured in the tributaries were found in the tributary where they had been caught and tagged Present Kristiansen and Doving, 1996
Thymallus arcticus Reproductive homing may be involved Present Northcote, 1993
Cottus gobio "Fish are faithful to permanent shelter for many years, Bullhead developed a fixation for their ""home"" stone, selecting it above others even when it moved, although for a short time the fish occasionally returned to its stone's original location. This suggests bullheads may home effectively, a finding that was supported by a field experiment in which 87% of fish were found under the stone six days after initial capture." Present Tomlinson and Perrow, 2003
Osmerus eperlanus Homing to spawning rivers is rare when distances between rivers within a geographic area such as an estuary are small Present Buckley, 1989