Male - Resting period



Species Primary Data Secondary Data References
Anguilla anguilla About 0.6 ± 0.28 for the yellow stage and 1.78 ± for the silver stage 0.6 months Acou, 2003
Anguilla anguilla > 1.4% for the silver stage 1.4 months Marchelidon, 1999
Aphanius iberus From September to February No data Vargas and De Sostoa, 1997
Valencia hispanica One period of quiescence: August to December No data Caiola, 2001
Barbatula barbatula 1 [Short] 1.0 months Skryabin, 1993
Barbatula barbatula 1 [Short] 1.0 months Saat, 2003
Barbatula barbatula From July to August, the GSI ranges between 3 and 20%, the higher values being largely late-spawners or non-spawners 3.0 months Smyly, 1955
Cobitis taenia Reduction in weight between June and september No data Robotham, 1981
Cobitis taenia Decrease between August and November No data Marconato and Rasotto, 1989
Cobitis taenia A phase or relative quiescence in gonad development follows preceeding until the next spring [From July to May] No data Vaino and Saat, 2003
Cobitis paludica A period of quiescence of 3 month [September-November] 3.0 months Oliva-Paterna, 2002
Blicca bjoerkna Relatively long period No data Rinchard, 1996
Blicca bjoerkna About 5 [July until the next spring] 5.0 months Rinchard and Kestemont, 1996
Blicca bjoerkna The ovary of the white bream enters a period of tranquillity between November and March No data Lefler, 2008
Abramis brama About one month No data Witkowski, 1989
Abramis brama The minimum values are found in June and July, which corresponds to a resting period of gonads after spawning No data Kompowski, 1982
Abramis brama GSI decreases after spawning to 0.88-3.1% in females with single batch spawning, and to 4.6-6.2% in females spawning in batches. In the latter females, the ovary reaches 10-16.3% of body weight again within 14-30 days 1.99 months Brylinska and Boron, 2004
Alburnoides bipunctatus 1 [Short in August] 1.0 months Yildirim, 1999
Alburnoides bipunctatus Spirlin collected after the spawning season (i.e. in July and especially in August) demosntrated different characteristics compared to those sampled during the spawning season. In July, 3 out of 5 fish ovaries still contained yolked oocytes, however, one female was likely to release one more spawning batch, whereas others appeared undergoing atretic process [...] In August, virtually none of the ovaries analyzed contained yolked oocytes, and the mean diameter was even 0.48 mm lower than that of sample from June 25 [...] 3.0 months Polacik and Kovac, 2006
Alburnus alburnus Relatively long period No data Rinchard, 1996
Alburnus alburnus >2 (August) 2.0 months Rinchard and Kestemont, 1996
Aspius aspius 3-3.5 [Between Mid-May until end of August] 3.25 months Shikhshabekov, 1979
Aspius aspius 1.61 [Between May to August] 1.61 months Kompowski et Neja, 2004
Barbus barbus There seems to be a two-month quiescent period (July-August) No data Lobon-Cervia and Fernandez-Delgado, 1984
Barbus barbus Following early spring spawning oocytes in the stage of primary growth are in majority in the ovary. Mitotically dividing oogonia, non-ovulated oocytes and eggs that were not released during spawning are also present in the ovaries. The latter two groups of cells undergo the process of resorption. Continuous atresia is also in process in the ovary that affects primarily the least developed functioning oocytes during the post-spawning period, i.e., those in the stage of primary growth. In all probability their number will further decrease immediatly after the spawning season No data Lefler, 2008
Carassius auratus August No data Kobayashi, 1986
Chondrostoma nasus Following early spring spawning oocytes in the stage of primary growth are in majority in the ovary. Mitotically dividing oogonia, non-ovulated oocytes and eggs that were not released during spawning are also present in the ovaries. The latter two groups of cells undergo the process of resorption. Continuous atresia is also in process in the ovary that affects primarily the least developed functioning oocytes during the post-spawning period, i.e., those in the stage of primary growth. In all probability their number will further decrease immediatly after the spawning season No data Lefler, 2008
Cyprinus carpio Few weeks after spawning No data Bieniarz, 1978
Cyprinus carpio About two months [June-July] No data Yaron and Levavi-Zermonsky, 1986
Cyprinus carpio About 5% in December-January 5.0 months Smith and Walker, 2004
Cyprinus carpio Post-spawning period: June-August No data Bieniarz, 1979
Cyprinus carpio July and august are a quiescent period of gonadal activity, a stage of regeneration No data Crivelli, 1981
Cyprinus carpio Re-maturation of the ovaries requires > 3-4 months 3.5 months Smith, 2004
Gobio gobio 1-2 [August-September] 1.5 months Kestemont, 1987
Gobio gobio 2-3 [From July through September] 2.5 months Rinchard, 1993
Gobio gobio From July, the ovary started a recovery phase and only contained stage 1 and 2 ooctyes. One ot two months of quiscence following summer spawning 1.0 months Kestemont, 1990
Leuciscus cephalus July, August No data Unlu and Balci, 1993
Leuciscus cephalus < 0.5 from July until December 0.5 months Kalkan, 2005
Leuciscus cephalus June-September quiescent period, About 1% 1.0 months Mann, 1976
Leuciscus cephalus <1% [From May to September] 1.0 months Sasi, 2003
Leuciscus cephalus Gonads of chub females and males after spawning remain in a resting state until September. No data Zelepien, 1997
Leuciscus cephalus In June, the GSI diminished because of spawning and continued to do so to the end of July No data Erdogan, 2002
Leuciscus leuciscus < 0.2% [From April to mid-July] 0.2 months Mann, 1974
Phoxinus phoxinus August No data Scott, 1979
Phoxinus phoxinus Very little growth takes place through the summer months No data Frost, 1943
Phoxinus phoxinus Between 3 June and 15 July there was a sharp drop in total condition princiapply beacause of a fall in GSI. This decline in GSI continued until late August 3.0 months Mills and Eloranta, 1985
Rutilus rutilus 3-4 (May-June-July-August) 3.5 months Rinchard, 1996
Rutilus rutilus 3 [From June to September] 3.0 months Mann, 1973
Rutilus rutilus 1.5-2 months, but could be shorted in heated reservoirs 1.75 months Witkowski, 1989
Rutilus rutilus <2% (End of May until Mid-Augsut) 2.0 months Rinchard and Kestemont, 1996
Rutilus rutilus May to June, July and stops in August [From graph] No data Tarkan, 2006
Rutilus rutilus After the spawning period, a quiescent period of gonad activity occurs during the summer because warm temperature (>20°C) and the long hours of daulight block the development of gonads until the end of August 20.0 months Gillet and Quétin, 2006
Scardinius erythrophthalmus >1 (August) 1.0 months Shikhshabekov, 1979
Scardinius erythrophthalmus From June to September No data Tarkan, 2006
Tinca tinca Between the last reproduction and the following spring (Period when water temperature is under 10°C) 10.0 months Breton, 1980
Tinca tinca Between October and March No data Linhart and Billard, 1995
Tinca tinca Period of restoration (August) and rest (since September till the end of April) lasted in tench from Lake Drweckie for 9 months. In this period all ovaries were in stage VI/II-III or VI/III, and then in stage III of maturity. Oocyte resorption was observed throughout the year. it was most intensive during fish production, especially in 1979 when water temperature showed considerable variations. 9.0 months Pimpicka, 1989
Tinca tinca August-September No data Alas and Solak, 2004
Tinca tinca 2.25 ± 0.1 (November) 2.25 months Pinillos, 2003
Tinca tinca Nearly 0 in July 0.0 months Yilmaz, 2002
Tinca tinca After spawning ovaries are in second stage. In that state they are the smallest during the yearly sexual cycle, are bloodshot, and remaining (non-spawned) oocytes are being resorbed. That state lasts 1 month. Later (from Ocotber until the beginning of April) ovaries are in the third stage of maturity. During that time growth of oocytes occurs. At the end of April/beginning of May ovaries are in the fourth maturity stage. Oocytes are being filled with yolk. At that time asynchronous development of oocytes occurs, which is typical for tench. During the next, five th maturity stage asynchrony becomes more deep. The size of ovaries reaches maximum. Four groups of different developmental advancement co-occur in the ovaries. The most mature oocytes continue yolk accumulation, the second group is at the final steps of vacuolisation, oocytes of the third group (=the last group that is going to be spawned during the spawning season) begin vacuolisation. The fourth group, which is the leats developped, will be spawned the next year. The VI-th maturity stage is ovulation (liberation of oocytes from the Graff follicles). Before ovulation nucleus moves from the centre to periphery of oocytes. 1.0 months Kubu and Kouril, 1985
Vimba vimba 3 (June until August) 3.0 months Shikhshabekov, 1979
Vimba vimba [July until October] No data Hliwa, 2002
Gambusia affinis 1.0-1.1 [From January to April] 1.05 months Koya, 1998
Esox lucius 3 Months (June to end of August) 3.0 months Lenhardt, 1992
Esox lucius 3 months [June to end of August] 3.0 months Billard, 1996
Esox lucius February/April (spawning period) until July No data Lenhardt and Cakic, 2002
Esox lucius April until August No data Treasurer, 1990
Lota lota 0.5 -1.3 [July 29] 3.15 months Brylinska, 2002
Lota lota April to August No data Pulliainen and Korhonen, 1990
Gasterosteus aculeatus September to February No data Copp, 2002
Gasterosteus aculeatus After the breeding season the weights decrease until the lowest level is attained in October No data Borg and Van Veen, 1982
Gasterosteus aculeatus September No data Sokolowska and Sokolowska, 2006
Pungitius pungitius September to February No data Copp, 2002
Pungitius pungitius Based on GSI graph, in August and perhaps until november No data Sokolowska and Skora, 2002
Lepomis gibbosus From August to March No data Copp, 2002
Lepomis gibbosus From Setember to May No data Burns, 1976
Micropterus salmoides 2 (September and October), < 1 (between September and October, declined between August, and mid-September) 2.0 months Rosenblum, 1994
Micropterus salmoides GSI were minimal ind mid-summer No data Bennett and Gibbons, 1975
Dicentrarchus labrax April to May (High percentage of atretic female) No data Prat, 1990
Dicentrarchus labrax < 0,5 [Between June to October, at Arcachon] 0.0 months Zohar, 1984
Dicentrarchus labrax June-October [In Arcachon, France], May-October [In Sète, France], April-July [Tunisia] No data Barnabé, 1980
Dicentrarchus labrax From June to early August, oocyte development is minimal No data Mayer, 1990
Morone americana June to end of October [From May to September, atretic oocytes were found within their ovaries] No data Jackson and Sullivan, 1995
Morone americana Mature-spent. Ovaries flacid, few translucent eggs left. Ovarian membrane very vascuar, sac-like, or bloodshot (May-June). Mature-Resting. Ovaries becoming firm, and characterized by a relatively thich doameter. No eggs discernible to the naked eye, color pinkish, texture gelatinous (June-july). No data Mansuetti, 1961
Morone chrysops Mid-July to mid-October No data Ruelle, 1977
Morone chrysops During the post-spawning period (May-September) No data Berlinsky, 1995
Morone saxatilis In summer, females had nothing more than primaryt growth oocytes No data Woods III and Sullivan, 1993
Morone saxatilis During the post spawning season (July, Aufgust, and September), when oocyte and ovarian diameters were smallest, sex detemrination was less accurate No data Blythe, 1994
Gymnocephalus cernuus 2-3 [June, July and August] 2.5 months Leino and McCormick, 1997
Perca flavescens Mid-June until Mid-August No data Malservisi and Magnin, 1968
Perca flavescens May until August No data Dabrowski, 1996
Perca flavescens Late April to August No data Hayes and Taylor, 1994
Perca flavescens <1% from July to August 1.0 months Tansichuk and Mackay, 1989
Perca fluviatilis 3-4 3.5 months Sulistyo,1998
Perca fluviatilis 4-4.5 [From April until August] 4.25 months Treasurer and Holliday, 1981
Perca fluviatilis Mid-summer No data Le Cren, 1951
Perca fluviatilis After spawning, GSI rapidly decreased to the low values observed during the summer No data Noaksson, 2004
Sander lucioperca From May-June the post-spawning season and from June to September the resting period No data Poulet, 2004
Sander vitreus By late spring, ovaries were already filled with a large number of non-vitellogenic oocytes, indicating that female have a relatively short post-spawning quiescient period No data Malison and Held, 1996b
Sander vitreus From May to October No data Malison, 1994
Sander vitreus Walleye have a relatively short post-spawning quiescent period No data Kestemont and Mélard, 2000
Sander vitreus 0.7 [July to August] 0.7 months Craig, 2000
Sander vitreus <1% July to August 1.0 months Colby, 1979
Coregonus lavaretus After spawning, the gonadosomatic ratio of females fell suddenly and remained low, about 1% of body weight, for 6 months until July[From March to May ovaries contained only primary (pre-vitellogenic) oocytes. Secondary oocytes, wihc chorion and yolkk precursors, appeared in May] 1.0 months Fuller, 1976
Coregonus lavaretus After spawning, the gonads were basically resting until April and May No data Heese, 1990
Coregonus albula 2.5-3 but up to 4-4.5 months in low temperature [January until May] 2.75 months Demska-Zakes and Dlugosz, 1995
Coregonus albula 2.5-3 months 2.75 months Dlugosz and Worniallo, 1985
Coregonus albula About 2 months 2.0 months Witkowski, 1989
Coregonus albula During the winter months, vendace remain in the regenerating and resting phaseses (maturation stages VI and II) for nominate form. For deepwater form, from May until July/August No data Anwand, 1998
Oncorhynchus kisutch In June to November for broodstock population cultured in a fish farm in Southern Chile No data Estay, 1998
Oncorhynchus mykiss 1 [December] 1.0 months Bon, 1999
Salmo trutta fario From January until April No data Billard, 1987
Salvelinus alpinus Recruitement of stage II and stage III oocyes was seen 1-2 months after ovulation had occured, and by February the next year all the post-ovulatory follicles had disappeared 1.5 months Frantzen, 1997
Salvelinus alpinus 0.3 (Resting period lasted until July) 0.3 months Jamet, 1995
Salvelinus fontinalis Oocyte development and yolk formation is relatively low from November until May No data Tam, 1986
Salvelinus fontinalis November to June, < 1% 1.0 months Wydoski and Cooper, 1966
Thymallus thymallus About two months: May and June No data Witkowski, 1989
Ameiurus nebulosus 6-7 [No significant differences between November to April] 6.5 months Burke, 1984
Ameiurus nebulosus About 1 (August-September, then slightly increased) 1.0 months Rosenblum, 1987
Ictalurus punctatus About 2 [GSI was low during the summer months: July and August] 2.0 months Mackenzie, 1989
Ictalurus punctatus About 4 [From July until November] 4.0 months Banks, 1999
Ictalurus punctatus An apparent low point in the annual ovarian cycle was reached immediatly after spawning No data Brauhn and McCraren, 1975
Silurus glanis July, August: 0.42-0.81% 0.615 months Zholdasova anGuseva, 1987
Silurus glanis September-October: >0.05% 0.05 months Alp, 2004
Anguilla anguilla <2.5 2.5 months NO REFERENCE
Anguilla anguilla About 0.1 for the silver stage 0.1 months Marchelidon, 1999
Aphanius iberus A period of repose from September to February No data Vargas and De Sostoa, 1997
Valencia hispanica From August to December No data Caiola, 2001
Barbatula barbatula 0.3-0.7 [Minimal value in mid-July, and by August GSI increased to about 1% and remained at this level until the next spring] 0.5 months Saat, 2003
Cobitis taenia Late June and early July [similar to female cycle] No data Vaino and Saat, 2003
Cobitis taenia September No data Marconato and Rasotto, 1989
Cobitis paludica Short quiescence period [August-September] No data Oliva-Paterna, 2002
Alburnoides bipunctatus 1.7 [n=3, August] 1.7 months Yildirim, 1999
Aspius aspius 0.14 [August] 0.14 months Kompowski et Neja, 2004
Barbus barbus No differences in term of GSI between September till January No data Lobon-Cervia and Fernandez-Delgado, 1984
Carassius auratus 0.3 ± 0.1 [August, but a large increased was oberseved in the Autum: about 4%)] 0.3 months Kobayashi, 1986
Cyprinus carpio Lower in december-January, about 2% 2.0 months Smith and Walker, 2004
Gobio gobio 0.9 [September to October] 0.9 months Kestemond, 1989
Leuciscus cephalus July to November, only germinal cells were evident No data Guerriero, 2005
Leuciscus cephalus April to November <0.5 0.5 months Sasi, 2003
Leuciscus cephalus June-September quiescent period, About 1% 1.0 months Mann, 1976
Leuciscus cephalus Gonads of females after spawning remain in spawning remain state until September No data Zelepien, 1997
Leuciscus leuciscus < 0.2% [From mid-April to mid-August] 0.2 months Mann, 1974
Phoxinus phoxinus Almost 0 [From September to February] 0.0 months Mills, 1987
Rutilus rutilus About 1 [During June-August] 1.0 months Escaffre and Billard, 1976
Rutilus rutilus About 1 [June, July until August] 1.0 months Mann, 1973
Rutilus rutilus June, July and August No data Tarkan, 2006
Tinca tinca 0.21 (November) 0.21 months Pinillos, 2003
Gambusia affinis Resting period is October to April [The GSI values (0.9-2.1%) from January to May] 1.5 months Koya and Iwase, 2004
Esox lucius < 0,1 [June, July, mid-August] 0.0 months Lenhardt, 1992
Esox lucius <0.2 [June-July] 0.2 months Billard, 1996
Esox lucius The resting period last from June until the end of August No data Lenhardt and Cakic, 2002
Esox lucius Stage I, rest from June to August, and stage IV, stage of post-spawning March to May No data Hoffmann, 1980
Esox lucius The index declined to 0.04-0.08 after spawning in early April and rose from late August 0.06 months Treasurer, 1990
Lota lota 0.5-2.7 [July 29th] 1.6 months Brylinska, 2002
Lota lota No difference in term of GSI between April and July, and even up to October No data Pulliainen and Korhonen, 1990
Gasterosteus aculeatus About 1% [From September to February] 1.0 months Copp, 2002
Pungitius pungitius About 1% [From September to February] 1.0 months Copp, 2002
Lepomis gibbosus October to May No data Burns, 1976
Micropterus salmoides < 0,1 (September, sharp decrease in August) 0.0 months Rosenblum, 1994
Dicentrarchus labrax < 0,5 [March to September] 0.0 months Zohar, 1984
Dicentrarchus labrax May-November [In Arcachon, France], May-October [In Sète, France], February-September [Tunisia] No data Barnabé, 1980
Dicentrarchus labrax From April to October No data Gonzalez and Piferrer, 2003
Morone americana About 0,2 (Basal summer value: June, July, September) 0.0 months Jackson and Sullivan, 1995
Morone americana Spent. Testes brownish white, flaccid and convoluted, with no flow or white milt upon compresison. April-early June No data Mansuetti, 1961
Morone chrysops 0.1 % |From early August to 0.1 months Ruelle, 1977
Morone saxatilis Male sex determination was lowest in September when testicular diameter was minimal No data Blythe, 1994
Morone saxatilis In June, after the second reproductive season, testes from mature fish strated to regress and spermatozoa were resorbed. In September (the beginning of the third reproductive cycle) only spermatogonia were present in the testes. No data Holland, 2000
Gymnocephalus cernuus Periods in which gametogensis is absent occuring between spring and autumn [The coefficients of maturity after discharge of the spermatozoids (in the absence of spermatogensis) is on average 0.8% (range 0.5-1.2%), and after completion of the rearrangement of the somatic elements of the testes less than 0.25% 0.85 months Butskaya, 1981
Perca flavescens Between 1 and 2 [After spawning, declined troughout the summer until August] 1.0 months Heidinger and Kayes, 1986
Perca flavescens Below 1%, in June and July 1.0 months Tansichuk and Mackay, 1989
Perca fluviatilis 0,2 ± 0,1 [Late June, July, August) 2.0 months Sulistyo, 2000
Perca fluviatilis 0.2 [June, July] 0.2 months Treasurer and Holliday, 1981
Perca fluviatilis < 1% [June, July, and most of August] 1.0 months Le Cren, 1951
Sander vitreus 0.2 [June-July] 0.2 months Colby, 1979
Sander vitreus <1% [From May through September] 1.0 months Malison, 1994
Coregonus lavaretus It fell gradually from January to a minimum of 0.4% in June and July 0.4 months Fuller, 1976
Coregonus lavaretus Below 1%, between February and May 1.0 months Heese, 1990
Coregonus albula 0.13-0.7 % [From December until March] 0.415 months Dlugosz and Worniallo, 1985
Coregonus albula During the winter months, vendace remain in the regenerating and resting phaseses (maturation stages VI and II) for nominate form. For deepwater form, from May until July/August No data Anwand, 1998
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha 5.39 ± 0.5 [Spawning grounds] 5.39 months Dye, 1986
Salmo trutta fario < 0 (April and May) 0.0 months Billard, 1987
Salvelinus alpinus Almost 0 (Between December to July, value in July = 0.6%) 0.0 months Jamet, 1995
Salvelinus fontinalis From November to June No data Wydoski and Cooper, 1966
Thymallus thymallus 0.3% [Three months after spawning May -July] 0.3 months Witkowski, 1989
Ameiurus nebulosus 0.15 (October, November) 0.15 months Rosenblum, 1987
Ameiurus nebulosus From 0.100 (September) to 0.158 (mid-April), with no significant differences between the mean values 0.1 months Burke, 1984
Ameiurus nebulosus Resting period is between mid-August to mid-April, i.e. 6 months 6.0 months Burke and Leatherland, 1984
Silurus glanis 0.12-0.25% at the end of July [June-July] 0.185 months Zholdasova and Guseva, 1987
Silurus glanis Low between August and November No data Alp, 2004