Egg - Egg Buoyancy



Species Primary Data Secondary Data References
Anguilla anguilla Pelagic Pelagic Deelder, 1970
Anguilla anguilla In sea water of 31 °/oo all eggs sink Semi-Pelagic Boetius and Boetius, 1980
Anguilla anguilla Under experimental conditions, the fertilized eggs rose toward the surface in a salinity of 35%o [The large fat drop ensures egg buyoancy] No category Prokhorchik, 1988
Anguilla anguilla Newly fertilized eggs were at or near the surface No category Pedersen, 2003
Anguilla anguilla More than 90% of the eggs from all different batches floated Pelagic Palstra, 2005
Anguilla anguilla Pelagic Pelagic Coad, 2005
Anguilla anguilla Buoyant (Pelagic) Pelagic Fishbase, 2006
Anguilla anguilla Pelagic eggs Pelagic Vincent, 2005
Alosa alosa Floats during a moment and then sinks to the bottom Ambiguous Spillmann, 1961
Alosa alosa Pelagic and could derive during several kms but then sinks to the bottom Ambiguous Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Alosa alosa Sink to the bottom Semi-Pelagic Bensettiti and Gaudillat, 2002
Alosa alosa Semi-buoyant [Tend to drift dowstream, most falling to the bottom and remaining there in crevices, until they hatch, some eggs drift for long distances below the spawning areas, sometimes several tens of kilometres] Ambiguous Maitland and Hatton-Ellis, 2000
Alosa fallax Pelagic and could derive but then sink to the bottom Ambiguous Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Alosa fallax Sink to the bottom Semi-Pelagic Spillmann, 1961
Alosa fallax Sink to the bottom Semi-Pelagic Doherty, 2004
Alosa fallax Sink to the bottom Semi-Pelagic Bensettiti and Gaudillat, 2002
Alosa sapidissima Demersal, semi-demersal or slightly heavier than fresh water, suspended by water-current [a moderate current (about 1 meter per second or less) will keep eggs floating] Ambiguous Internet, 2005
Alosa sapidissima Only slightly heavier than water, they settle singly and are carried along by the current No category Scott and Crossman, 1973
Alosa sapidissima Demersal, semi-demersal or slightly heavier than fresh water, suspended by water-current [a moderate current (about 1 meter per second or less) will keep eggs floating] Ambiguous Everly and Boreman, 1999
Alosa sapidissima Slightly heavier than water and are carried by the currents and gradually sink Semi-Pelagic Mills, 2004
Alosa sapidissima On the bottom (demersal) No category Fishbase, 2006
Alosa sapidissima Semi-demersal to pelagic No category Rue, 2001
Alosa sapidissima In coastal habitats, females lay demersal eggs No category Anonymous, 2006 Chapter 3
Alosa sapidissima Eggs are released into open water where they are carried along by currents, and being slightly heavier than water, gradually sink to the bottom Semi-Pelagic Bradbury, 1999
Alosa sapidissima Shortly after being spawned, the water-hardened eggs start to sink. [described as either demersal or semidemersal depending on whether the researcher assume that eggs stayed on the bottom or were lifted off the bottom by turbulent current. Some eggs remained suspended in the water column for several kilometers] Semi-Pelagic Burdick and Hightower, 2005
Alosa sapidissima Calculations based on eggs ages when collected indicate most eggs traveled only 1 to 4 miles from where spawned. Pelagic Marcy, 1972
Aphanius iberus Demersal [Eggs are deposited on plants located on the ground] Demersal Billard, 1997
Valencia hispanica Demersal [Eggs are deposited one by one] Demersal Keith, 2001
Barbatula barbatula Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Barbatula barbatula The eggs from these fish were found scattered over the bottom of the pond, the majority singly No category Smyly, 1955
Cobitis taenia Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Cobitis taenia Demersal [Fall through the gauze into the box] Demersal Bohlen, 1999
Cobitis taenia Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Blicca bjoerkna Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Blicca bjoerkna Demersal [Attached to dense vegetation in shallow water] Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Blicca bjoerkna Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Abramis brama Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Abramis brama Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Alburnoides bipunctatus Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Alburnus alburnus Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Aristichthys nobilis Drifting egg [The largest number of eggs are found in the upper water layer in the main river chanel] Pelagic Abdusamadov, 1986
Aristichthys nobilis Eggs developp in pelagic water of the river current [The buoyancy of the egg is achieved by the penetration under the membrane of a considerable amount of water and the creation of perivitelline space] No category Mikodina and Makeyeva, 1981
Aristichthys nobilis Bathypelagic, require tuburlent current to stay suspended No category Schrank, 2001
Aristichthys nobilis Semi-buoyant and must remain suspended in the water column by the turbulence of the moving water in order to hatch Ambiguous Kolar, 2005
Aristichthys nobilis Develop in pelagic water No category Kunz, 2004
Aristichthys nobilis The eggs of chinese carps are semibuoyant and are carried by currents until they hatch Ambiguous Scholfield, 2005
Aristichthys nobilis The eggs are bathypelagic and must float to hatch [In rivers of eastern Asia, if spawning occurs during periods of rising water levele, the eggs and larvae are carried out dowstream by the current to quiet, flodded lakes, creeks, and channels, which serve as nursery areas] Pelagic Jennigs, 1988
Aristichthys nobilis They produce eggs that are semi-buoyant and require a curent to float Ambiguous Schrank, 1999
Aristichthys nobilis Having a greater specific gravity than water, eggs sink to the bottom in still water, yet, they are semi-buoyant in a current, floating until the fry hatch Ambiguous Naca, 1989
Aspius aspius Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Barbus barbus Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Carassius auratus Demersal Demersal Internet, 2005
Carassius carassius Demersal Demersal Holopainen, 1997
Carassius carassius Demersal [On the bottom] Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Chondrostoma nasus Demersal [Sink to the bottom] Ambiguous Spillmann, 1961
Chondrostoma nasus Demersal Demersal Heckeis, 1996
Chondrostoma nasus Eggs among stones and gravel where their development occurs Demersal Kamler and Keckeis, 2000
Chondrostoma nasus Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Chondrostoma toxostoma Demersal [eggs are deposited on boulders in deep pools] Demersal Gozlan, 1999
Ctenopharyngodon idella Pelagic, only water-hardened eggs floated Pelagic Lahnsteiner, 2001
Ctenopharyngodon idella Pelagic Pelagic Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Ctenopharyngodon idella Pelagic Pelagic Le Houarn, 2001
Ctenopharyngodon idella Drifting egg [The largest number of eggs are found in the upper water layer in the main river chanel] Pelagic Abdusamadov, 1986
Ctenopharyngodon idella Eggs developp in pelagic water of the river current [The buoyancy of the egg is achieved by the penetration under the membrane of a considerable amount of water and the creation of perivitelline space] No category Mikodina and Makeyeva, 1981
Ctenopharyngodon idella Semi-buoyant [eggs may travel downstream 50 to 180 km] Ambiguous Cudmore and Mandrak, 2004
Ctenopharyngodon idella Develop in pelagic water No category Kunz, 2004
Ctenopharyngodon idella The eggs of chinese carps are semibuoyant and are carried by currents until they hatch Ambiguous Scholfield, 2005
Ctenopharyngodon idella Currents carry the eggs and larvae to the quiet water at the tributary mouth No category Brown and Coon, 1991
Ctenopharyngodon idella Grass carp eggs are semi-buoyant and must be agitated or they will sink to the bottom and die Ambiguous Leslie, 1982
Ctenopharyngodon idella Eggs and prolarvae drift more than 500 km dowstream in the Amur Pelagic Gorbach and Krykhtin, 1988
Ctenopharyngodon idella The semi-buoyant eggs theoretically may drift from 50 to 180 km before hatching Ambiguous Shireman and Smith, 1983
Ctenopharyngodon idella Having a greater specific gravity than water, eggs sink to the bottom in still water, yet, they are semi-buoyant in a current, floating until the fry hatch Ambiguous Naca, 1989
Cyprinus carpio Demersal Demersal Internet, 2005
Cyprinus carpio Demersal [eggs which fail to attach themselves to something will fall to the bottom of the pond and perish] Demersal Mickaels, 1988
Cyprinus carpio Demersal Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Cyprinus carpio Demersal Demersal Tyler and Sumpter, 1996
Gobio gobio Demersal Demersal Kennedy and Fitzmaurice, 1972
Gobio gobio Demersal Demersal Tyler and Sumpter, 1996
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Pelagic, only water-hardened eggs floated Pelagic Lahnsteiner, 2001
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Semi-pelagic and derive to the downstream No category Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Semi-pelagic [Needs a river must be longer than 200 km] No category Billard, 1997
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Pelagic Pelagic Barbier, 2001
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Drifting egg [The largest number of eggs are found in the upper water layer in the main river chanel] Pelagic Abdusamadov, 1986
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Eggs developp in pelagic water of the river current [The buoyancy of the egg is achieved by the penetration under the membrane of a considerable amount of water and the creation of perivitelline space] No category Mikodina and Makeyeva, 1981
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Semi-buoyant eggs Ambiguous Kolar, 2005
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Silver carp shed bathypelagic eggs in river systems No category Esmaeili and Johal, 2005
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Develop in pelagic water No category Kunz, 2004
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix The eggs of chinese carps are semibuoyant and are carried by currents until they hatch Ambiguous Scholfield, 2005
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Pelagic eggs and larvae are carried more than 500 km from the spawning grounds Pelagic Gorbach and Kryhtin, 1988
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Having a greater specific gravity than water, eggs sink to the bottom in still water, yet, they are semi-buoyant in a current, floating until the fry hatch Ambiguous Naca, 1989
Leucaspius delineatus Demersal Demersal Cassou and Le Louarn, 1991
Leuciscus cephalus Dermersal, negatively buoyant Ambiguous Calta, 2000
Leuciscus cephalus Stuck to the bottom of the box No category Penaz and Sterba, 1969
Leuciscus leuciscus Demersal Demersal Spillmann, 1961
Leuciscus leuciscus Demersal Demersal Persat, 2001
Leuciscus leuciscus Demersal Demersal Tyler and Sumpter, 1996
Leuciscus leuciscus Negatively bouyant No category Mills, 1981
Mylopharyngodon piceus Bathypelagic and carried by currents No category Crosier, 2005
Mylopharyngodon piceus Eggs developp in pelagic water of the river current [The buoyancy of the egg is achieved by the penetration under the membrane of a considerable amount of water and the creation of perivitelline space] No category Mikodina and Makeyeva, 1981
Mylopharyngodon piceus Pelagic Pelagic Fishbase, 2006
Mylopharyngodon piceus Develop in pelagic water No category Kunz, 2004
Mylopharyngodon piceus The eggs of chinese carps are semibuoyant and are carried by currents until they hatch Ambiguous Scholfield, 2005
Mylopharyngodon piceus Having a greater specific gravity than water, eggs sink to the bottom in still water, yet, they are semi-buoyant in a current, floating until the fry hatch Ambiguous Naca, 1989
Phoxinus phoxinus Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Phoxinus phoxinus Demersal Demersal Mann, 1996
Phoxinus phoxinus Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Pimephales promelas Demersal [Eggs are spawned on the undersurfaces of submerged or floating objects] Ambiguous Gale and Buynak, 1982
Pimephales promelas Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Pimephales promelas Lay their eggs on the under side of objects that lie horizontal to or at an angle with the surface of water No category Markus, 1934
Pseudorasbora parva Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Rhodeus sericeus Dense, sinking quickly in freshwater Semi-Pelagic Smith, 2004
Rhodeus sericeus Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Rutilus rutilus Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Rutilus rutilus Demersal Demersal Tyler and Sumpter, 1996
Rutilus rutilus Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Scardinius erythrophthalmus Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Scardinius erythrophthalmus Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Tinca tinca Demersal [Female lay their eggs] Demersal Feunteun, 2001
Vimba vimba Demersal [Deposit on gravel and stones] Demersal Coad, 2005
Vimba vimba The fertilized spawn adheres to the stones or becomes covered by the gravel of the river bottom Demersal Wajdowicz, 1974
Vimba vimba Fertilized eggs drifting with the current fall upon the stony - gravel bottom Ambiguous Trzebiatowski and Narozanski, 1973
Gambusia affinis Demersal [but embedded in the ovary] Demersal Internet, 2005
Esox masquinongy Demersal Demersal Dombeck, 1984
Esox masquinongy Semidermersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Esox masquinongy Demersal Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Esox masquinongy Fertilized eggs drop into the vegetation No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Esox masquinongy Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Esox masquinongy The eggs are released to fall as they will No category Pennslylvania fishes, 2006
Esox niger Demersal Demersal Coffie, 1998
Esox niger Initially demersal but become semibuoyant by the eyed stage Ambiguous Dombeck, 1984
Esox niger Demersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Esox niger Eggs are demersal when first deposited, but apparently becoming semibuoyant to buoyant at eyed stage Ambiguous Fishbase, 2006
Esox niger Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Esox lucius Demersal [Sink after extrusion] Ambiguous Toner and Lawler, 1969
Esox lucius Demersal [Sink to the bottom] Ambiguous Dorier, 1938
Esox lucius Demersal [On the bottom] Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Esox lucius Demersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Esox lucius Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Lota lota Semi-buoyant [easily transported by slight water movements] Ambiguous Van Houdt, 2003
Lota lota Demersal, and carried by the current Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Lota lota Semi-pelagic, fall slowly on the ground No category Persat, 2001
Lota lota On the bottom, demersal No category Fishbase, 2006
Lota lota Semibuoyant Ambiguous Hudd and Kjellman, 2002
Lota lota Eggs are semi-buoyant when first laid, but become demersal within a few days and settle into interstices into the substrate Ambiguous Bradbury, 1999
Lota lota The eggs are semipelagic (partially float) and sink slowly to the bottom Ambiguous Anonymous, 2003
Lota lota Eggs are demersal, but the presence of a large fat droplet makes the eggs remain near the bottom in a suspended condition No category Kirillov, 1989
Lota lota Eggs develop inthe water column, but others described it at on the bottom. 24 hours after fertilisation eggs sink to the bottom. Before sinking eggs are transported downstream with water. At water current speed of 0.2 m/s eggs sink to the bottom and remain. On the rough ground, at the current speed of 4 m/s eggs start to float, and all eggs are washed out by a water current of 8 m/s Ambiguous Kujawa, 2002
Lota lota Semi-buoyant eggs settle to the bottom in quiet water, may be carried from spawning site by slight current Ambiguous Goodyear, 1982
Gasterosteus aculeatus Demersal Demersal Internet, 2005
Gasterosteus aculeatus Demersal Demersal Tyler and Sumpter, 1996
Gasterosteus aculeatus They are opaque and heavier than water. No category Swarup, 1958
Pungitius pungitius Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Ambloplites rupestris Demersal [sink in to the nest] Ambiguous Gross and Nowell, 1980
Ambloplites rupestris Incubate on rootlets or venegation in nest No category Goodyear, 1982
Lepomis gibbosus Demersal Demersal Internet, 2005
Lepomis gibbosus Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Micropterus dolomieui Demersal Demersal Internet, 2005
Micropterus dolomieui Demersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Micropterus dolomieui Demersal in the nest Demersal Rue, 2001
Micropterus salmoides Demersal, settle to the bottom Demersal Heidinger, 1976
Micropterus salmoides Dermersal Demersal Internet, 2005
Micropterus salmoides Dermersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Micropterus salmoides Drop to the bottom of the nest No category Kerr and Grant, 1999
Dicentrarchus labrax Buoyant Pelagic Fishbase, 2006
Dicentrarchus labrax Pelagic Pelagic Tyler and Sumpter, 1996
Dicentrarchus labrax Floating eggs [Sinking eggs were all non-fertilized] Ambiguous Saillant, 2001
Dicentrarchus labrax During incubation studies, the eggs demonstrated pelagic properties in salinities over 35%o and demersal properties in salinities below 34 %o No category Saka, 2001
Dicentrarchus labrax Small pelagic eggs No category Mayer, 1990
Dicentrarchus labrax Buoyant Pelagic Fornies, 2001
Dicentrarchus labrax Pelagic Pelagic Secor, 2002
Dicentrarchus labrax The fecund egg is pelagic, spherical and translucent No category Dechauvelle and Coves, 1988
Dicentrarchus labrax Pelagic Pelagic Barnabé, 1980
Dicentrarchus labrax The percentage which were of good quality was detemirned by mesuaring the proportion of floating (good quality) to sinking (ppor quality) Ambiguous Carillo, 1989
Dicentrarchus labrax Buoyant eggs Pelagic Cerda, 1994
Dicentrarchus labrax Egg quality was assessed according to the volume of the floating (viable) eggs Pelagic Zanuy, 1995
Morone americana When laid, eggs are demersal No category Stanley and Danie, 1983
Morone americana Demersal Demersal Everly and Boreman, 1999
Morone americana Eggs are demersal and attached, or can be pelagic No category Rue, 2001
Morone americana Laboratory studies showed that upon being exuded and fertilized the ova sink to the bottom Semi-Pelagic Mansuetti, 1961
Morone chrysops Demersal Demersal Internet, 2005
Morone chrysops Demersal [Eggs becoming fertilized as they sink] Ambiguous Scott and Crossman, 1973
Morone chrysops Demersal Demersal Kohler, 1997
Morone chrysops Eggs are fertilized as they sink to the bottom Semi-Pelagic Anonymous, 2006 Chapter 3
Morone saxatilis Slightly heavier than freswater, suspended near bottom, planktonic Pelagic Internet, 2005
Morone saxatilis Planktonic Pelagic Will, 2002
Morone saxatilis Buoyant (pelagic) Pelagic Fishbase, 2006
Morone saxatilis Semibuoyant and may be swept by the current Ambiguous Scott and Crossman, 1973
Morone saxatilis Semibuoyant Ambiguous Everly and Boreman, 1999
Morone saxatilis The semi-buoyant eggs are spawned near the surface where they rely on water turbulence to keep from sinking Ambiguous Burdick and Hightower, 2005
Morone saxatilis Pelagic Pelagic Secor, 2002
Morone saxatilis Spawn pelagic eggs, the slighly heavy eggs are suspended by current greater than 0.3 m/s No category North and Houde, 2001
Morone saxatilis Semibuoyant: that is they sink but are swpet up from the bottom by the slightest disturbance of the water Ambiguous Merriman, 1937
Morone saxatilis Most eggs were maintained in the water column by the upwelling current generated by micropore aeration around the central standpipe and the 1.1 liter per min circular flow of incoming water below the surface No category Martin-Robichaud and Peterson, 1998
Gymnocephalus cernuus Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Gymnocephalus cernuus On the bottom demersal No category Fishbase, 2006
Perca flavescens Semi-demersal [Strands are slightly heavier than water and float in the current until they become untangled in debris] Pelagic Mansueti, 1964
Perca flavescens Egg masses are semi-buoyant [They undulate with water movement and adhere to submerged vegetation or, at times, to the bottom] Ambiguous Scott and Crossman, 1973
Perca flavescens The egg cases are semi-buoyant and attach to submerged vegetation or occasionally to the bottom Ambiguous Anonymous, 2006 Chapter 3
Perca fluviatilis Demersal [The egg strand is slightly heavier than water] Demersal Craig, 2000
Perca fluviatilis Demersal, on the bottom Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Perca fluviatilis The egg-ribbon itself is freely floaing in water No category Mansour, 2008
Sander lucioperca Demersal Demersal Craig, 2000
Sander lucioperca The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Sander lucioperca Demersal Demersal Lehtonen, 1996
Sander vitreus Demersal [Drop into the cracks and crevices where they may be protected from predators] Demersal Colby, 1979
Sander vitreus Demersal Demersal Craig, 2000
Sander vitreus Demersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Sander vitreus Demersal, on the bottom Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Sander vitreus Dead eggs floated to the top Pelagic Hurley, 1972
Coregonus lavaretus Demersal [Sink to the bottom] Ambiguous Skurdal, 1985
Coregonus lavaretus The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Coregonus albula Demersal Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Coregonus albula The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Coregonus clupeaformis Demersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Coregonus clupeaformis Demersal [The eggs fall into crevices where they develop over the winter] Demersal Kerr and Grant, 1999
Coregonus clupeaformis The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Coregonus clupeaformis Demersal eggs incubate on spawning substrate, often in crevices between and under rocks Demersal Goodyear, 1982
Coregonus clupeaformis Settle in rocky crevices where they remain No category Bradbury, 1999
Hucho hucho Demersal Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Hucho hucho The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Demersal Demersal Groot, 1996
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Demersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Oncorhynchus keta Demersal [Fall into the crevices] Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus keta The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Oncorhynchus kisutch Demersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus kisutch Soon absorb water, becoming water hardened and semi-buoyant Ambiguous Kerr and Grant, 1999
Oncorhynchus kisutch The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Oncorhynchus mykiss Demersal Demersal Internet, 2005
Oncorhynchus mykiss Demersal Demersal Tyler and Sumpter, 1996
Oncorhynchus mykiss Demersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus mykiss The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Oncorhynchus mykiss Sink deeply into crevices Semi-Pelagic Greeley, 1932
Oncorhynchus nerka Demersal [The female prepares a nest] Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus nerka The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Demersal Demersal Internet, 2005
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Demersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Soon absorb water, becoming water hardened and semi-buoyant Ambiguous Kerr and Grant, 1999
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Chinook salmon eggs incubate within the riverbed at depths ranging from 18 to 43 cm beneath the riverbed surface No category Hanrahan, 2007
Salmo salar Demersal [Female digs nest] Demersal Dumas and Darolles, 1999
Salmo salar Eggs are temporarily adhesive, but soon absorb water, becoming water-hardened and semi-buoyant Ambiguous Kerr and Grant, 1999
Salmo salar The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Salmo salar Heavier than water Demersal Bensettiti and Gaudillat, 2002
Salmo salar Occurs in the gravel of redds Demersal Dumas and Marty, 2006
Salmo trutta fario Demersal [The female dig few nests] Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Salmo trutta fario The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Salmo trutta fario Eggs incubate under gravel or on other substrate in redd Demersal Goodyear, 1982
Salvelinus alpinus Demersal Demersal Groot, 1986
Salvelinus alpinus Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Salvelinus alpinus Demersal [Buried in the gravel] Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Salvelinus alpinus The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Salvelinus fontinalis Demersal [Deposited into a nest] Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Salvelinus fontinalis The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Salvelinus fontinalis Eggs incubate under gravel and sand in redd Demersal Goodyear, 1982
Salvelinus namaycush Demersal (on the bottom) Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Salvelinus namaycush Demersal [Fertilized egg fall into the crevices between the large rocks] Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Salvelinus namaycush The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Salvelinus namaycush Shortly after release, eggs settle to the bottomand lodge in crevices among rocks No category Bradbury, 1999
Salvelinus namaycush Eggs usually incubate in crevices in the susbtrate Demersal Goodyear, 1982
Stenodus leucichthys Demersal [Deposited on the bottom] Demersal Belyaeva, 2005
Stenodus leucichthys Demersal [On the bottom] Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Stenodus leucichthys The eggs of Salmonidae are buried in unguarded nests called 'redds' and are demersal-nonadheive No category Kunz, 2004
Thymallus thymallus Demersal [Eggs only buried] Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Thymallus thymallus Brood hiders, Bury their eggs under several centimetres of substratum in gravel nests Demersal Sempeski and Gaudin, 1995
Thymallus thymallus Eggs are deposited Demersal Billard, 1997
Thymallus thymallus Eggs are deposited a few centimetres below the gravel surface Demersal Haugen and Vollestad, 2000
Thymallus thymallus Les œufs ne sont pas visibles à la surface, mais si l'on écarte les pierres et les galets, on les découvre enterrés à une profondeur de 4 centimètres environ. Immédiatement après le frai, les œufs pénètrent lentement entre les pierres, un certain nombre d'entre eux sont entraînes par le courant lorsque les graviers du fond sont remués par des accouplements ultérieurs Demersal Vivier, 1958
Thymallus arcticus Demersal Demersal Scott and Crossman, 1973
Thymallus arcticus Heavy No category Northcote, 1995
Cottus gobio Demersal, sink to the bottom Ambiguous Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Ameiurus nebulosus Demersal Demersal Internet, 2005
Ameiurus nebulosus Incubate in bottom of nest Demersal Goodyear, 1982
Ameiurus nebulosus Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Ameiurus nebulosus Demersal Demersal Internet, 2001
Ictalurus punctatus Demersal Demersal Internet, 2005
Ictalurus punctatus Settle to the bottom Demersal Wellborn and Tucker, 1985
Ictalurus punctatus Demersal eggs lay in the nest Demersal Rue, 2001
Ictalurus punctatus Incubates on bottom of nest Demersal Goodyear, 1982
Ictalurus punctatus Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Ictalurus punctatus Demersal Demersal Riggs, 1961
Ictalurus punctatus Most catfish possess demersal eggs Demersal Legendre, 1997
Silurus glanis Most catfish possess demersal eggs Demersal Legendre, 1997
Silurus glanis Demersal Demersal Bruslé and Quignard, 2001
Osmerus eperlanus Some of the eggs become detached and float with help of the outer coat, but seems to be only dead eggs Pelagic Belyanina, 1969
Osmerus eperlanus Eggs sink to the bottom Demersal Ivanova and Polovka, 1972
Osmerus eperlanus Fertilized eggs are demersal Demersal Buckley, 1989
Osmerus eperlanus Demersal Demersal Rochard, 2001
Osmerus eperlanus Are deposited on a range of substrates around the limit of the tidal influence Demersal Quigley, 2004
Osmerus eperlanus Demersal Demersal Kunz, 2004
Osmerus eperlanus Demersal [On the bottom] Demersal Fishbase, 2006
Osmerus eperlanus May stick to different substrates at the bottom of water body Demersal Gorodilov and Melnikova, 2006